Enterohemorrhagic escherichia coli infection stimulates shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells

Valeriy Lukyanenko, Irina Malyukova, Ann Hubbard, Michael Delannoy, Edgar Boedeker, Chengru Zhu, Liudmila Cebotaru, Olga Kovbasnjuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gastrointestinal infection with Shiga toxins producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli causes the spectrum of gastrointestinal and systemic complications, including hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is fatal in ~10% of patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of Stx endocytosis by enterocytes and the toxins cross the intestinal epithelium are largely uncharacterized. We have studied Shiga toxin 1 entry into enterohemorrhagic E. coli-infected intestinal epithelial cells and found that bacteria stimulate Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis through actin remodeling. This enterohemorrhagic E. coli-caused macropinocytosis occurs through a nonmuscle myosin II and cell division control 42 (Cdc42)-dependent mechanism. Macropinocytosis of Shiga toxin 1 is followed by its transcytosis to the basolateral environment, a step that is necessary for its systemic spread. Inhibition of Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis significantly decreases toxin uptake by intestinal epithelial cells and in this way provides an attractive, antibioticindependent strategy for prevention of the harmful consequences of enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)C1140-C1149
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology
Volume301
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • Diarrhea
  • Foodborne pathogens
  • Transcytosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Enterohemorrhagic escherichia coli infection stimulates shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this