Enhancing recruitment and retention of minority populations for clinical research in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine an official american thoracic society research statement

Neeta Thakur, Fernando Holguin, Jennifer Alvidrez, Raolat Abdulai, Donna Appell, Richardae Araojo, Christian Bime, Esteban G. Burchard, Lauren Castro, Juan C. Celedon, Juliana Ferreira, Marvella E. Ford, Maureen George, Leroy Graham, Carolyn Hendrickson, James P. Kiley, Stephanie Lovinsky-Desir, Yolanda Mageto, Arch G. Mainous, Smita PakhaleRodney Reese, Kristin A. Riekert, Jesse Roman, Elizabeth Ruvalcaba, Sunil Sharma, Priya Shete, Ginger Spitzer, Juan P. Wisnivesky

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Well-designed clinical research needs to obtain information that is applicable to the general population. However, most current studies fail to include substantial cohorts of racial/ ethnic minority populations. Such underrepresentation may lead to delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis of disease, wide application of approved interventions without appropriate knowledge of their usefulness in certain populations, and development of recommendations that are not broadly applicable. Goals: To develop best practices for recruitment and retention of racial/ethnic minorities for clinical research in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. Methods: The American Thoracic Society convened a workshop in May of 2019. This included an international interprofessional group from academia, industry, the NIH, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with expertise ranging from clinical and biomedical research to community-based participatory research methods and patient advocacy. Workshop participants addressed historical and current mistrust of scientific research, systemic bias, and social and structural barriers to minority participation in clinical research. A literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar was performed to support conclusions. The search was not a systematic review of the literature. Results: Barriers at the individual, interpersonal, institutional, and federal/policy levels were identified as limiting to minority participation in clinical research. Through the use of a multilevel framework, workshop participants proposed evidence-based solutions to the identified barriers. Conclusions: To date, minority participation in clinical research is not representative of the U.S. and global populations. This American Thoracic Society research statement identifies potential evidence-based solutions by applying a multilevel framework that is anchored in community engagement methods and patient advocacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E26-E50
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Volume204
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021

Keywords

  • Clinical research
  • Health disparities
  • Minorities
  • Recruitment
  • Retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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