Enhanced diagnosis of pneumococcal bacteremia using antigen-and molecular-based tools on blood specimens in Mali and Thailand: A prospective surveillance study

Jennifer C. Moïsi, Matthew Moore, Maria Da Gloria Carvalho, Samba O. Sow, Duangkamon Siludjai, Maria Deloria Knoll, Milagritos Tapia, Henry C. Baggett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75-88% sensitive and 96-100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-275
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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