Engineering complex tissues

Antonios G. Mikos, Susan W. Herring, Pannee Ochareon, Jennifer Hartt Elisseeff, Helen H. Lu, Rita Kandel, Frederick J. Schoen, Mehmet Toner, David Mooney, Anthony Atala, Mark E. Van Dyke, David Kaplan, Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop "Tissue Engineering-The Next Generation," which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a "guided interplay" between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elissceff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from "adult biology" of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician's perspective for functional tissue regeneration, and discussed new biomaterials that can be used to develop new regenerative technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3307-3339
Number of pages33
JournalTissue Engineering
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Fingerprint

Tissue Engineering
Tissue
Tissue engineering
Biocompatible Materials
Tissue regeneration
Cartilage
Regeneration
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Biomaterials
Bone
Bone and Bones
Hydrogels
Heart Valves
Ligaments
Osteogenesis
Tendons
Blood Vessels
Stem cells
Stem Cells
Scaffolds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Mikos, A. G., Herring, S. W., Ochareon, P., Elisseeff, J. H., Lu, H. H., Kandel, R., ... Vunjak-Novakovic, G. (2006). Engineering complex tissues. Tissue Engineering, 12(12), 3307-3339. https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.2006.12.3307

Engineering complex tissues. / Mikos, Antonios G.; Herring, Susan W.; Ochareon, Pannee; Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt; Lu, Helen H.; Kandel, Rita; Schoen, Frederick J.; Toner, Mehmet; Mooney, David; Atala, Anthony; Van Dyke, Mark E.; Kaplan, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana.

In: Tissue Engineering, Vol. 12, No. 12, 12.2006, p. 3307-3339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mikos, AG, Herring, SW, Ochareon, P, Elisseeff, JH, Lu, HH, Kandel, R, Schoen, FJ, Toner, M, Mooney, D, Atala, A, Van Dyke, ME, Kaplan, D & Vunjak-Novakovic, G 2006, 'Engineering complex tissues', Tissue Engineering, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 3307-3339. https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.2006.12.3307
Mikos AG, Herring SW, Ochareon P, Elisseeff JH, Lu HH, Kandel R et al. Engineering complex tissues. Tissue Engineering. 2006 Dec;12(12):3307-3339. https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.2006.12.3307
Mikos, Antonios G. ; Herring, Susan W. ; Ochareon, Pannee ; Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt ; Lu, Helen H. ; Kandel, Rita ; Schoen, Frederick J. ; Toner, Mehmet ; Mooney, David ; Atala, Anthony ; Van Dyke, Mark E. ; Kaplan, David ; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana. / Engineering complex tissues. In: Tissue Engineering. 2006 ; Vol. 12, No. 12. pp. 3307-3339.
@article{2c201611e2d94361935c2e4bf0db010a,
title = "Engineering complex tissues",
abstract = "This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop {"}Tissue Engineering-The Next Generation,{"} which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a {"}guided interplay{"} between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elissceff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from {"}adult biology{"} of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician's perspective for functional tissue regeneration, and discussed new biomaterials that can be used to develop new regenerative technologies.",
author = "Mikos, {Antonios G.} and Herring, {Susan W.} and Pannee Ochareon and Elisseeff, {Jennifer Hartt} and Lu, {Helen H.} and Rita Kandel and Schoen, {Frederick J.} and Mehmet Toner and David Mooney and Anthony Atala and {Van Dyke}, {Mark E.} and David Kaplan and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1089/ten.2006.12.3307",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "3307--3339",
journal = "Tissue Engineering",
issn = "1076-3279",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Engineering complex tissues

AU - Mikos, Antonios G.

AU - Herring, Susan W.

AU - Ochareon, Pannee

AU - Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt

AU - Lu, Helen H.

AU - Kandel, Rita

AU - Schoen, Frederick J.

AU - Toner, Mehmet

AU - Mooney, David

AU - Atala, Anthony

AU - Van Dyke, Mark E.

AU - Kaplan, David

AU - Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

PY - 2006/12

Y1 - 2006/12

N2 - This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop "Tissue Engineering-The Next Generation," which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a "guided interplay" between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elissceff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from "adult biology" of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician's perspective for functional tissue regeneration, and discussed new biomaterials that can be used to develop new regenerative technologies.

AB - This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop "Tissue Engineering-The Next Generation," which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a "guided interplay" between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elissceff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from "adult biology" of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician's perspective for functional tissue regeneration, and discussed new biomaterials that can be used to develop new regenerative technologies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845955655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845955655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ten.2006.12.3307

DO - 10.1089/ten.2006.12.3307

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 3307

EP - 3339

JO - Tissue Engineering

JF - Tissue Engineering

SN - 1076-3279

IS - 12

ER -