Engaging families through motivational interviewing

Adrienne A. Williams, Katherine Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Helping parents change key behaviors may reduce the risk of child maltreatment. However, traditional provider-centered approaches to working with the parents of pediatric patients may increase resistance to behavioral change. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centered communication technique that helps address problems of provider-centered approaches. In this article, evidence for use of MI to address several risk factors for child maltreatment is reviewed, including parental substance abuse, partner violence, depression treatment, harsh punishment, and parental management of children's health. Fundamental components of MI that may be incorporated into clinical practice are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)907-921
Number of pages15
JournalPediatric Clinics of North America
Volume61
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
Child Abuse
Parents
Punishment
Violence
Substance-Related Disorders
Communication
Depression
Pediatrics
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Child maltreatment
  • Health behavior change
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Pediatrics
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Engaging families through motivational interviewing. / Williams, Adrienne A.; Wright, Katherine.

In: Pediatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 61, No. 5, 01.10.2014, p. 907-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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