Energy balance and obesity: what are the main drivers?

On behalf of the IARC working group on Energy Balance and Obesity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this paper is to review the evidence of the association between energy balance and obesity. Methods: In December 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France convened a Working Group of international experts to review the evidence regarding energy balance and obesity, with a focus on Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). Results: The global epidemic of obesity and the double burden, in LMICs, of malnutrition (coexistence of undernutrition and overnutrition) are both related to poor quality diet and unbalanced energy intake. Dietary patterns consistent with a traditional Mediterranean diet and other measures of diet quality can contribute to long-term weight control. Limiting consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has a particularly important role in weight control. Genetic factors alone cannot explain the global epidemic of obesity. However, genetic, epigenetic factors and the microbiota could influence individual responses to diet and physical activity. Conclusion: Energy intake that exceeds energy expenditure is the main driver of weight gain. The quality of the diet may exert its effect on energy balance through complex hormonal and neurological pathways that influence satiety and possibly through other mechanisms. The food environment, marketing of unhealthy foods and urbanization, and reduction in sedentary behaviors and physical activity play important roles. Most of the evidence comes from High Income Countries and more research is needed in LMICs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-258
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Obesity
Diet
Energy Intake
Malnutrition
Overnutrition
Mediterranean Diet
International Agencies
Weights and Measures
Food
Urbanization
Microbiota
Beverages
Marketing
Research
Epigenomics
Energy Metabolism
Weight Gain
France
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Energy balance
  • Energy expenditure
  • Energy intake
  • Obesity
  • Satiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

On behalf of the IARC working group on Energy Balance and Obesity (2017). Energy balance and obesity: what are the main drivers? Cancer Causes and Control, 28(3), 247-258. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-017-0869-z

Energy balance and obesity : what are the main drivers? / On behalf of the IARC working group on Energy Balance and Obesity.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 247-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

On behalf of the IARC working group on Energy Balance and Obesity 2017, 'Energy balance and obesity: what are the main drivers?', Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 247-258. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-017-0869-z
On behalf of the IARC working group on Energy Balance and Obesity. Energy balance and obesity: what are the main drivers? Cancer Causes and Control. 2017 Mar 1;28(3):247-258. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-017-0869-z
On behalf of the IARC working group on Energy Balance and Obesity. / Energy balance and obesity : what are the main drivers?. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 247-258.
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