Endocrine neoplasia in New World primates

José L.C. Dias, Richard J. Montali, John D. Strandberg, Linda K. Johnson, Michael J. Wolff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Of 1,106 New World primates necropsied from the National Zoological Park (Washington, D.C.) and the Department of Comparative Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Baltimore, Maryland) 22 (1.9%) animals were identified with 27 neoplasms. Of this group, nine animals (two females, seven males) had a total of 13 endocrine neoplasms. All animals were adults, with an age range of 2.7-25 years (average, 12.1 years). Seven were Callitrichidae and two were Cebidae. The adrenal gland was the most affected organ, with seven (53.8%) neoplasms, followed by the pituitary and thyroid gland with two (15.4%) cases each, and the pancreas and parathyroid gland with one tumor (7.7%) each. All neoplastic disorders were benign. Immunocytochemistry assays for growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and chromogranin A were performed on two pituitary neoplasms. Pheochromocytoma was the most frequent neoplasm, representing 5 (38.4%) of the 13 neoplasms. The remaining were thyroid cystadenoma (two, 15.4%), corticotrophic cell pituitary adenoma (two, 15.4%), adrenal ganglioneuroma (one, 7.7%), adrenal cortical adenoma (one, 7.7%), parathyroid chief-cell adenoma (one, 7.7%), and pancreatic islet-cell adenoma (one, 7.7%).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Medical Primatology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1996

Keywords

  • Callitrichidae
  • Cebidae
  • Monkey
  • Pheochromocytoma
  • Pituitary tumor
  • Platyrrhini

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

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