Endocrine effects of the cold pressor test: Relationships to subjective pain appraisal and coping

Monika Bullinger, Dieter Naber, David Pickar, Robert M. Cohen, Ned H. Kalin, Agu Pert, William E. Bunney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Blood was drawn from 14 normal volunteers twice before, immediately after a 1-minute immersion of the nondominant hand in ice water (cold pressor test), and twice during recovery. Serum levels of β-endorphin, cortisol, prolactin, growth hormone, and opioid activity were determined, and measures of subjective pain appraisal and coping styles were obtained. Cortisol was the only variable to show a significant increase as a function of noxious stimulation. Correlational analysis yielded relationships between neuroendocrine variables and subjective pain appraisal as well as coping styles, suggesting complex interactions between neuroendocrine and psychological processes in human pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-233
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • coping
  • endorphins
  • hormones
  • Pain
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

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