Endocrine, cardiovascular, and psychological correlates of olfactory sensitivity changes during the human menstrual cycle

Richard L. Doty, Peter J. Snyder, George R. Huggins, Louis D. Lowry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Established signal detection measures of olfactory sensitivity (d′) and measures of blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, nasal airflow, and respiration rate in test sessions held across 17 menstrual cycles of 9 females not taking oral contraceptives, 6 menstrual cycles of 3 females taking oral contraceptives, and 6 equivalent time periods of 3 males. Ss were between the ages of 18 and 37. In addition, plasma levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, estrone, estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone and responses to the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) were established. Peaks in olfactory sensitivity were noted during the 2nd half of menses, midcycle, and midluteally in females taking and not taking oral contraceptives. The lack of correlation between the fluctuations in d′ and the circulating hormone levels in Ss using oral contraceptives suggests that factors other than gonadal hormones were responsible for these changes. Significant fluctuations were also noted across the cycle phases of the normally cycling females for all the hormones examined, as well as for body temperature, nasal airflow, and the MDQ Water Retention and Pain scales. (74 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-60
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • blood pressure &
  • body temperature &
  • heart rate &
  • nasal airflow &
  • respiration rate correlates of olfactory sensitivity changes during menstrual cycle, 18-37 yr old females

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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