Endemic giardiasis in New Hampshire: A case-control study of environmental risks

David T. Dennis, Robert P. Smith, Joyce J. Welch, Christopher Chute, Barbara Anderson, Joy L. Herndon, C. Fordham Von Reyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Giardiasis is the most frequently reported diarrheal disease in northern New England. A case-control study of endemic giardiasis and environmental risk factors among residents of New Hampshire involved 273 cases from the state's 1984 disease registry and 375 controls. Giardiasis was associated with a shallow dug well as a residential water source (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-47.0), a recent history of drinking untreated surface water (OR = 3.4; CI, 2.1-5.5), a history of swimming in a lake or pond (OR = 4.6; CI, 2.4-86.0) or swimming in any natural body of fresh water (OR = 4.0; CI, 2.3-70.0), contact with a person thought to have giardiasis (OR = 2.3; CI, 1.4-36.0), and recent contact with a child in day care (OR = 1.5; CI, 1.0-2.1). Multivariate modeling supported these associations. Shallow wells, relatively common in New Hampshire, have not previously been established as important sources of giardiasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1391-1395
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume167
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Giardiasis
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
New England
Water
Body Water
Child Care
Lakes
Fresh Water
Drinking
Registries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Dennis, D. T., Smith, R. P., Welch, J. J., Chute, C., Anderson, B., Herndon, J. L., & Von Reyn, C. F. (1993). Endemic giardiasis in New Hampshire: A case-control study of environmental risks. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 167(6), 1391-1395.

Endemic giardiasis in New Hampshire : A case-control study of environmental risks. / Dennis, David T.; Smith, Robert P.; Welch, Joyce J.; Chute, Christopher; Anderson, Barbara; Herndon, Joy L.; Von Reyn, C. Fordham.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 167, No. 6, 06.1993, p. 1391-1395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dennis, DT, Smith, RP, Welch, JJ, Chute, C, Anderson, B, Herndon, JL & Von Reyn, CF 1993, 'Endemic giardiasis in New Hampshire: A case-control study of environmental risks', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 167, no. 6, pp. 1391-1395.
Dennis DT, Smith RP, Welch JJ, Chute C, Anderson B, Herndon JL et al. Endemic giardiasis in New Hampshire: A case-control study of environmental risks. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1993 Jun;167(6):1391-1395.
Dennis, David T. ; Smith, Robert P. ; Welch, Joyce J. ; Chute, Christopher ; Anderson, Barbara ; Herndon, Joy L. ; Von Reyn, C. Fordham. / Endemic giardiasis in New Hampshire : A case-control study of environmental risks. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1993 ; Vol. 167, No. 6. pp. 1391-1395.
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