End-Stage Renal Disease in US minority groups

H. I. Feldman, Michael John Klag, A. P. Chiapella, P. K. Whelton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Medicare's End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program makes renal replacement services accessible for the majority of Americans with renal failure. National data from Medicare demonstrate complex and variable patterns of use of renal replacement services among US racial and ethnic groups. The black population has consistently suffered from a greater than 3.5-fold higher rate of treated ESRD than has the white population. The rates of hypertensive, diabetic, and glomerulopathic ESRD are all substantially greater in blacks than in whites, and hypertension has accounted for a far greater proportion of ESRD in blacks than any other diagnosis. There is a paucity of national data on the occurrence of ESRD in Hispanic Americans. However, data from Texas strongly suggest that the incidence rate of treated ESRD is much higher in Mexican Americans than in non-Hispanic whites. Higher rates are apparent for each of the three most important causes of ESRD: hypertension, diabetes, and glomerulonephritis. Native Americans experience ESRD at a rate intermediate between those of whites and blacks, but their rate of diabetic ESRD is higher than in either blacks or whites. However, considerable diversity exists among Native American tribal groups. Significant barriers to the acquisition of preventive care have been identified, especially for blacks. While these barriers to preventive care are accompanied by a significantly impaired health status of the black American population, a specific causal relationship between impaired access to care for blacks and their predisposition to ESRD has not been established.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-410
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume19
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992

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Minority Groups
Chronic Kidney Failure
Preventive Medicine
North American Indians
Medicare
Population
Kidney
Renal Hypertension
Glomerulonephritis
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Health Status
Renal Insufficiency
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Feldman, H. I., Klag, M. J., Chiapella, A. P., & Whelton, P. K. (1992). End-Stage Renal Disease in US minority groups. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 19(5), 397-410.

End-Stage Renal Disease in US minority groups. / Feldman, H. I.; Klag, Michael John; Chiapella, A. P.; Whelton, P. K.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 19, No. 5, 1992, p. 397-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feldman, HI, Klag, MJ, Chiapella, AP & Whelton, PK 1992, 'End-Stage Renal Disease in US minority groups', American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 397-410.
Feldman HI, Klag MJ, Chiapella AP, Whelton PK. End-Stage Renal Disease in US minority groups. American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 1992;19(5):397-410.
Feldman, H. I. ; Klag, Michael John ; Chiapella, A. P. ; Whelton, P. K. / End-Stage Renal Disease in US minority groups. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 1992 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 397-410.
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