Employer and Employee Opinions about Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs: Results of the 2015 Harris Poll Nielsen Survey

Katherine McCleary, Ron Z. Goetzel, Enid Chung Roemer, Jeff Berko, Karen Kent, Hector De La Torre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to provide a current picture of the state of workplace health promotion (wellness) programs in the U.S. from both employer and employee perspectives. Methods: We analyzed data from two independent surveys of employers (N = 1500) and the general population (N = 4611). Results: Employers reported offering wellness programs at almost twice the rate of employees who reported having these programs available to them. Most (59.4%) employees felt employers should play a role in improving worker health and nearly three-fourths (72.1%) thought that lower insurance premiums should be offered for participation in wellness programs. However, fewer than half felt that their work environment allows them to maintain good health. Conclusion: Although wellness programs are offered at the majority of workplaces in the U.S., employees are unlikely to be aware of these efforts and would like employers to be forthcoming in providing programs promoting good health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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