Emotional functioning, barriers, and medication adherence in pediatric transplant recipients

Megan L. McCormick King, Laura L. Mee, Ana M. Gutiérrez-Colina, Cyd K. Eaton, Jennifer L. Lee, Ronald L. Blount

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective This study assessed relationships among internalizing symptoms, barriers to medication adherence, and medication adherence in adolescents with solid organ transplants. Method The sample included 72 adolescents who had received solid organ transplants. Multiple mediator models were tested via bootstrapping methods. Results Bivariate correlations revealed significant relationships between barriers and internalizing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress, as well as between internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Barriers indicative of adaptation to the medication regimen (e.g., forgetting, lack of organization) were related to medication adherence and mediated the relationship between internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Conclusions These findings indicate that barriers may serve as a more specific factor in the relationship between more general, pervasive internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Results may help guide areas for clinical assessment, and the focus of interventions for adolescent transplant recipients who are experiencing internalizing symptoms and/or who are nonadherent to their medication regimen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-293
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Adolescents
  • Anxiety
  • Chronic illness
  • Depression
  • Health behavior
  • Organ transplantation
  • Posttraumatic stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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