Emerging Evidence Toward a 2:1 Clinical to Simulation Ratio: A Study Comparing the Traditional Clinical and Simulation Settings

Nancy J Sullivan, Sandra M. Swoboda, Tonya Breymier, Laura S Lucas, Janice Sarasnick, Tonya Rutherford-Hemming, Chakra B. Budhathoki, Suzan (Suzie) Kardong-Edgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: There is limited evidence comparing the clinical and simulation environments. Methods: This multicenter observational study compared traditional clinical to simulation on the type, number, and level of educational activities as determined by Miller's Pyramid. Results: Forty-two students’ experience revealed that skills, physical assessment, teaching, and critical thinking activities occurred more frequently in simulation, with safety interventions more common in clinical. In addition, in simulation, students performed a greater percentage of activities in higher levels of Millers Pyramid, “Knows How”; 12.8% as compared with 8.6% in clinical, and “Does”; 66.3% as compared with 46.2% in clinical. Notably, the activities in “Does” were completed in approximately 1/5 of the time in simulation; 440 minutes, as compared with clinical; 2,137 minutes. Conclusion: The intensity and efficiency of simulation was demonstrated through the completion of more activities in higher levels of Millers Pyramid in significantly less time than clinical providing emerging evidence toward a 2:1 clinical to simulation ratio.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Simulation in Nursing
Volume30
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • clinical nursing education
  • clinical/simulation ratio
  • Millers pyramid
  • simulation
  • traditional clinical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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