Emergency use authorization for intravenous peramivir: Evaluation of safety in the treatment of hospitalized patients infected with 2009 H1N1 influenza a virus

Alfred Sorbello, S. Christopher Jones, Wendy Carter, Kimberly Struble, Robert Boucher, Melissa Truffa, Debra Birnkrant, Neha Gada, Sara Camilli, Irene Chan, Scott Dallas, Twanda Scales, Robert Kosko, Elizabeth Thompson, Jesse Goodman, Henry Francis, Gerald Dal Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. On 23 October 2009, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for intravenous peramivir, an unapproved antiviral, to treat suspected or confirmed 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus infection. Eligible hospitalized patients were unresponsive to or unable to tolerate available antivirals or lacked dependable oral or inhaled drug delivery routes. The EUA required healthcare providers to report medication errors, selected adverse events (AEs), serious AEs, and deaths to the FDA.Methods.An FDA safety team analyzed reports submitted to the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and sought follow-up in selected cases.Results.The FDA received AERS reports for 344 patients (including 28 children and 3 pregnant women). Many patients were critically ill on mechanical ventilation (41) and renal replacement therapies (19); 38 had received oseltamivir. The most frequently reported serious AEs by MedDRA preferred term were death (15), H1N1 influenza (8), respiratory failure (8), acute renal failure (7), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (7). Six medication errors were reported. Most deaths occurred among patients who were obese, immunosuppressed, aged >65 years, or received oseltamivir. Rash was the only treatment-emergent AE attributable to peramivir. Influenza severity, comorbidities, and concomitant medications confounded additional peramivir AE assessments. Missing clinical and laboratory data precluded evaluation of some reports.Conclusions.Many peramivir recipients under the EUA were critically ill and at risk for influenza-related complications. The safety data were insufficient to assess whether peramivir affected outcome or caused adverse reactions other than rash. Clinical trials in hospitalized patients with serious influenza infections should provide additional information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

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