Emergency department presentation, admission, and surgical intervention for colonic diverticulitis in the United States

Eric B. Schneider, Aparajita Singh, Jennifer Sung, Benjamin Hassid, Shalini Selvarajah, Sandy H Fang, Jonathan Efron, Anne O. Lidor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Diverticulitis in admitted inpatients is well reported. This study examined colonic diverticulitis treated in the emergency department (ED). Methods The 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was used to examine relationships among patient age and inpatient admission, surgical intervention, and in-hospital mortality among ED patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulitis. Results Of 310,983 ED visits for primary diverticulitis, 53% resulted in hospitalization and 6% in surgical intervention. Most patients 65+ years old were female (69%), and most were hospitalized (63%). Seven percent of ED patients aged 65+ underwent surgery and.96% died in hospital. Patients aged less than 40 years (13% of all admissions) were mostly male (63%), 42% were hospitalized, 4% underwent surgery, and less than.01% died. Compared with patients aged less than 40 years, those 65+ demonstrated greater odds of admission (odds ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 1.64) and surgical intervention (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 1.65). Conclusions Half of ED patients were hospitalized and 6% of ED visits resulted in colectomy. Fully 13% of ED patients were less than 40 years old. Future studies examining outpatient services may further illuminate the epidemiology of diverticulitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-407
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume210
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Colonic Diverticulitis
Hospital Emergency Service
Diverticulitis
Inpatients
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Colectomy
Ambulatory Care
Hospital Mortality
Epidemiology
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • Diverticulitis
  • Emergency department
  • Surgical intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Emergency department presentation, admission, and surgical intervention for colonic diverticulitis in the United States. / Schneider, Eric B.; Singh, Aparajita; Sung, Jennifer; Hassid, Benjamin; Selvarajah, Shalini; Fang, Sandy H; Efron, Jonathan; Lidor, Anne O.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 210, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 404-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schneider, Eric B. ; Singh, Aparajita ; Sung, Jennifer ; Hassid, Benjamin ; Selvarajah, Shalini ; Fang, Sandy H ; Efron, Jonathan ; Lidor, Anne O. / Emergency department presentation, admission, and surgical intervention for colonic diverticulitis in the United States. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2015 ; Vol. 210, No. 2. pp. 404-407.
@article{3a2c869bacb24cbfa624afebffe5979a,
title = "Emergency department presentation, admission, and surgical intervention for colonic diverticulitis in the United States",
abstract = "Background Diverticulitis in admitted inpatients is well reported. This study examined colonic diverticulitis treated in the emergency department (ED). Methods The 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was used to examine relationships among patient age and inpatient admission, surgical intervention, and in-hospital mortality among ED patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulitis. Results Of 310,983 ED visits for primary diverticulitis, 53{\%} resulted in hospitalization and 6{\%} in surgical intervention. Most patients 65+ years old were female (69{\%}), and most were hospitalized (63{\%}). Seven percent of ED patients aged 65+ underwent surgery and.96{\%} died in hospital. Patients aged less than 40 years (13{\%} of all admissions) were mostly male (63{\%}), 42{\%} were hospitalized, 4{\%} underwent surgery, and less than.01{\%} died. Compared with patients aged less than 40 years, those 65+ demonstrated greater odds of admission (odds ratio 1.53, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.43 to 1.64) and surgical intervention (odds ratio 1.45, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.27 to 1.65). Conclusions Half of ED patients were hospitalized and 6{\%} of ED visits resulted in colectomy. Fully 13{\%} of ED patients were less than 40 years old. Future studies examining outpatient services may further illuminate the epidemiology of diverticulitis.",
keywords = "Diverticulitis, Emergency department, Surgical intervention",
author = "Schneider, {Eric B.} and Aparajita Singh and Jennifer Sung and Benjamin Hassid and Shalini Selvarajah and Fang, {Sandy H} and Jonathan Efron and Lidor, {Anne O.}",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.12.050",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "210",
pages = "404--407",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emergency department presentation, admission, and surgical intervention for colonic diverticulitis in the United States

AU - Schneider, Eric B.

AU - Singh, Aparajita

AU - Sung, Jennifer

AU - Hassid, Benjamin

AU - Selvarajah, Shalini

AU - Fang, Sandy H

AU - Efron, Jonathan

AU - Lidor, Anne O.

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - Background Diverticulitis in admitted inpatients is well reported. This study examined colonic diverticulitis treated in the emergency department (ED). Methods The 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was used to examine relationships among patient age and inpatient admission, surgical intervention, and in-hospital mortality among ED patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulitis. Results Of 310,983 ED visits for primary diverticulitis, 53% resulted in hospitalization and 6% in surgical intervention. Most patients 65+ years old were female (69%), and most were hospitalized (63%). Seven percent of ED patients aged 65+ underwent surgery and.96% died in hospital. Patients aged less than 40 years (13% of all admissions) were mostly male (63%), 42% were hospitalized, 4% underwent surgery, and less than.01% died. Compared with patients aged less than 40 years, those 65+ demonstrated greater odds of admission (odds ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 1.64) and surgical intervention (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 1.65). Conclusions Half of ED patients were hospitalized and 6% of ED visits resulted in colectomy. Fully 13% of ED patients were less than 40 years old. Future studies examining outpatient services may further illuminate the epidemiology of diverticulitis.

AB - Background Diverticulitis in admitted inpatients is well reported. This study examined colonic diverticulitis treated in the emergency department (ED). Methods The 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was used to examine relationships among patient age and inpatient admission, surgical intervention, and in-hospital mortality among ED patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulitis. Results Of 310,983 ED visits for primary diverticulitis, 53% resulted in hospitalization and 6% in surgical intervention. Most patients 65+ years old were female (69%), and most were hospitalized (63%). Seven percent of ED patients aged 65+ underwent surgery and.96% died in hospital. Patients aged less than 40 years (13% of all admissions) were mostly male (63%), 42% were hospitalized, 4% underwent surgery, and less than.01% died. Compared with patients aged less than 40 years, those 65+ demonstrated greater odds of admission (odds ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 1.64) and surgical intervention (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 1.65). Conclusions Half of ED patients were hospitalized and 6% of ED visits resulted in colectomy. Fully 13% of ED patients were less than 40 years old. Future studies examining outpatient services may further illuminate the epidemiology of diverticulitis.

KW - Diverticulitis

KW - Emergency department

KW - Surgical intervention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84931574582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84931574582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.12.050

DO - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.12.050

M3 - Article

C2 - 26002192

AN - SCOPUS:84931574582

VL - 210

SP - 404

EP - 407

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

IS - 2

ER -