Emergence of opportunistic mould infections in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient

Arlo Upton, Kieren Marr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Infection due to opportunistic moulds is an emerging problem in hematopoietic stem cell recipients. Through the 1990s, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis in allogeni0c graft recipients climbed steadily, peaking at 10% to 15%. In this decade, other opportunistic mould infections are emerging, including zygomycosis, fusariosis, and scedosporiosis. These epidemiologic changes are likely due to greater or different types of host immune suppression, medical interventions such as antifungal prophylaxis, and more successful treatment of aspergillosis, keeping immunosuppressed patients alive and at risk. The non-Aspergillus moulds generally exhibit variable susceptibility to antifungal agents, and outcomes continue to be disappointing. Thus, prevention of infection becomes a prominent concern in the care of these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-441
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Infectious Disease Reports
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Opportunistic Infections
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Fungi
Aspergillosis
Transplants
Fusariosis
Zygomycosis
Antifungal Agents
Infection
Patient Care
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Emergence of opportunistic mould infections in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient. / Upton, Arlo; Marr, Kieren.

In: Current Infectious Disease Reports, Vol. 8, No. 6, 11.2006, p. 434-441.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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