Elevated Platelet MAO is Related to Impulsivity in Disruptive Behavior Disorders

DAVID M. STOFF, EITAN FRIEDMAN, LEAFY POLLOCK, BENEDETTO VITIELLO, PHILIP C. KENDALL, WAGNER H. BRIDGER

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was measured in 32 drug-free prepubertal boys with externalizing symptoms of disruptive behavior disorders and 47 boys with no DSM-III-R diagnoses, and correlated to questionnaire and laboratory performance measures of impulsivity. A subgroup of boys with high MAO activity exhibited significantly poorer performance (i.e., more impulsivity) than a subgroup of low MAO activity on laboratory tasks requiring response inhibition. High MAO patients were more impulsive than high MAO controls on some performance tasks and elevated platelet MAO was unrelated to personality questionnaire measures of impulsivity or to patient status. These data suggest that biological markers such as MAO activity may correlate better with performance than clinical questionnaire measures. Abnormally high platelet MAO activity may not be sufficient to produce externalizing symptoms in children, perhaps interacting with an underlying behavioral dimension of impulsivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)754-760
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Keywords

  • children
  • conduct disorder
  • disruptive behavior disorders
  • impulsivity
  • monoamine oxidase
  • platelets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    STOFF, DAVID. M., FRIEDMAN, EITAN., POLLOCK, LEAFY., VITIELLO, BENEDETTO., KENDALL, PHILIP. C., & BRIDGER, WAGNER. H. (1989). Elevated Platelet MAO is Related to Impulsivity in Disruptive Behavior Disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 28(5), 754-760. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004583-198909000-00018