Elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio is associated with poor long-term survival and graft failure after lung transplantation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: We aimed to assess the prognostic value of Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) on long-term outcomes and graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients receiving a lung transplant at our institution from 2011 to 2014. The primary exposure was elevated NLR at the time of transplant, defined by NLR>4. The primary outcomes were graft failure and three-year all-cause mortality. Multivariate logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were used to analyze outcomes. Results: 95 patients were included. 40 patients (42%) had an elevated NLR. Elevated NLR was associated with graft failure (OR: 4.7 [1.2–18.8], p = 0.02), and three-year mortality (OR: 5.4 [1.3–23.2], p = 0.03) on multivariate logistic regression. Patients with elevated NLR demonstrated significantly lower survival on Kaplan-Meier analysis (50% versus 74%, p = 0.02). The c-statistic for our multivariate model was 0.91. Conclusion: Elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio is associated with poor long-term survival and graft failure after lung transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Immunology
  • Lung transplantation
  • Outcomes
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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