Elevated HDL cholesterol levels are associated with osteoporosis in lung transplant candidates with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Robert M. Reed, Robert A. Wise, Adrian S. Dobs, Noah Lechtzin, Reda E. Girgis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Osteoporosis is common in advanced COPD and worsens rapidly after transplantation, potentially impairing quality of life. Increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) has been observed in COPD and linked with osteoporosis in the general population. This association has not been previously examined in COPD. Methods: We reviewed the records of 245 COPD patients referred for lung transplant evaluation. Osteoporosis was defined by either dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan or use of osteoporosis medications. The presence or absence of osteoporosis could be ascertained in 152 subjects. Cholesterol values and other clinical variables were assessed for their association with osteoporosis. Results: Clinical factors associated with osteoporosis included lower BMI [OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.73-0.90], higher HDLc [OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.07], and worse lung function. HDLc was an independent predictor of OP and demonstrated an inverse linear correlation with T-scores (r = -0.21, p = 0.05), which was stronger amongst males (r = -0.45, p = 0.004). Conclusion: In COPD patients referred for lung transplantation, osteoporosis is highly prevalent. Raised HDLc levels are common in this group and are independently associated with OP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1943-1950
Number of pages8
JournalRespiratory Medicine
Volume104
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • High density lipoprotein cholesterol
  • Lung transplantation
  • Osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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