Elevated cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor in Tourette's syndrome

Comparison to obsessive compulsive disorder and normal controls

Phillip Chappell, James Leckman, Wayne Goodman, Garth Bissette, David Pauls, George Anderson, Mark A Riddle, Lawrence Scahill, Christopher McDougle, Donald Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stress- and anxiety-related fluctuations in tic severity are cardinal features of Tourette's syndrome (TS), and there is evidence for involvement of noradrenergic mechanisms in the pathophysiology and treatment of the disorder. To examine further the pathobiology of this enhanced vulnerability to stress and anxiety, we measured central activity of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in patients with TS and the related condition, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained in a standardized fashion for measurement of CRF from 21 medication-free outpatients with TS, 20 with OCD, and 29 healthy controls. The TS patients had significantly higher levels of CSF CRF than both the normal controls and the OCD patients. However, there was no difference in CSF CRF between the OCD patients and the normal controls. Group differences in CSF CRF were unrelated to current clinical ratings of depression, anxiety, tics, and obsessive compulsive behaviors. Although the functional significance of this finding remains to be elucidated, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that stress-related neurobiological mechanisms may play a role in the pathology of TS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-783
Number of pages8
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tourette Syndrome
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Tics
Anxiety
Compulsive Behavior
Obsessive Behavior
Outpatients
Depression
Pathology

Keywords

  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • CRF
  • Norepinephrine
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Stress
  • Tourette syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Elevated cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor in Tourette's syndrome : Comparison to obsessive compulsive disorder and normal controls. / Chappell, Phillip; Leckman, James; Goodman, Wayne; Bissette, Garth; Pauls, David; Anderson, George; Riddle, Mark A; Scahill, Lawrence; McDougle, Christopher; Cohen, Donald.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 39, No. 9, 01.05.1996, p. 776-783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chappell, Phillip ; Leckman, James ; Goodman, Wayne ; Bissette, Garth ; Pauls, David ; Anderson, George ; Riddle, Mark A ; Scahill, Lawrence ; McDougle, Christopher ; Cohen, Donald. / Elevated cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor in Tourette's syndrome : Comparison to obsessive compulsive disorder and normal controls. In: Biological Psychiatry. 1996 ; Vol. 39, No. 9. pp. 776-783.
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