Elevated cancer mortality in the relatives of patients with pancreatic cancer

Li Wang, Kieran A. Brune, Kala Visvanathan, Daniel Laheru, Joseph Herman, Christopher Wolfgang, Richard Schulick, John L Cameron, Michael S Goggins, Ralph H Hruban, Alison Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most inherited cancer syndromes are characterized by the familial clustering of cancers at several organ sites. To determine if cancers, other than pancreatic cancer, cluster in pancreatic cancer kindreds, we examined mortality patterns among the relatives of National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry probands. Over 200,000 person-years of follow-up from 8,564 first-degree relatives of probands and 1,007 spouse controls were included in these analyses. We compared mortality rates of National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry participants to US population rates using weighed standardized mortality ratios (wSMR). Analyses were stratified by family history of pancreatic cancer (sporadic versus familial), family history of young onset pancreatic cancer (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2829-2834
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

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Pancreatic Neoplasms
Mortality
Neoplasms
Registries
Spouses
Cluster Analysis
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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abstract = "Most inherited cancer syndromes are characterized by the familial clustering of cancers at several organ sites. To determine if cancers, other than pancreatic cancer, cluster in pancreatic cancer kindreds, we examined mortality patterns among the relatives of National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry probands. Over 200,000 person-years of follow-up from 8,564 first-degree relatives of probands and 1,007 spouse controls were included in these analyses. We compared mortality rates of National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry participants to US population rates using weighed standardized mortality ratios (wSMR). Analyses were stratified by family history of pancreatic cancer (sporadic versus familial), family history of young onset pancreatic cancer (",
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AU - Wang, Li

AU - Brune, Kieran A.

AU - Visvanathan, Kala

AU - Laheru, Daniel

AU - Herman, Joseph

AU - Wolfgang, Christopher

AU - Schulick, Richard

AU - Cameron, John L

AU - Goggins, Michael S

AU - Hruban, Ralph H

AU - Klein, Alison

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