Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves for pain control. A 10-year experience

D. M. Long, D. Erickson, James N Campbell, R. North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients who underwent implantation of dorsal column stimulators from 1970 to 1973 were reviewed 7-10 years following stimulation. The number who achieved satisfactory pain relief was not significant. The criteria for selecting these patients were reviewed utilizing those now used in 1980. 50% of the patients originally selected would not be rejected for psychological or drug-related reasons. This long-term evaluation indicates no benefit to the patients treated with spinal cord stimulation. However, it appears that psychological factors were the most important reasons for failure. A smaller group of patients studied for 3-5 years following implantation of epidural spinal cord stimulators achieved a 70% pain control rate. Selection factors that explain these differences are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Neurophysiology
Volume44
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1981

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Spinal Cord Stimulation
Spinal Nerves
Neuralgia
Peripheral Nerves
Electric Stimulation
Psychology
Pain
Spinal Cord
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves for pain control. A 10-year experience. / Long, D. M.; Erickson, D.; Campbell, James N; North, R.

In: Applied Neurophysiology, Vol. 44, No. 4, 1981, p. 207-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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