Efficacy of superovulation and intrauterine insemination in the treatment of infertility

David S. Guzick, Sandra Ann Carson, Christos Coutifaris, James W. Overstreet, Pam Factor-Litvak, Michael P. Steinkampf, Joseph A. Hill, Luigi Mastroianni, John E. Buster, Steven T. Nakajima, Donna L. Vogel, Robert E. Canfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Induction of superovulation with gonadotropins and intrauterine insemination are frequently used to treat infertility. We conducted a large, randomized, controlled clinical trial of these treatments. Methods: We studied 932 couples in which the woman had no identifiable infertility factor and the man had motile sperm. The couples were randomly assigned to receive intracervical insemination, intrauterine insemination, superovulation and intracervical insemination, or superovulation and intrauterine insemination. Treatment continued for four cycles unless pregnancy was achieved. Results: The 231 couples in the group treated with superovulation and intrauterine insemination had a higher rate of pregnancy (33 percent) than the 234 couples in the intrauterine-insemination group (18 percent), the 234 couples in the group treated with superovulation and intracervical insemination (19 percent), or the 233 couples in the intracervical-insemination group (10 percent). Stratified, discrete-time Cox proportional-hazards analysis showed that the couples in the group treated with superovulation and intrauterine insemination were 3.2 times as likely to become pregnant as those in the intracervical-insemination group (95 percent confidence interval, 2.0 to 5.3) and 1.7 times as likely as those in the intrauterine-insemination group (95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 2.6). The couples in the intrauterine-insemination group and in the group treated with superovulation and intracervical insemination were nearly twice as likely to conceive as those in the intracervical-insemination group. Conclusions: Among infertile couples, treatment with induction of superovulation and intrauterine insemination is three times as likely to result in pregnancy as is intracervical insemination and twice as likely to result in pregnancy as is treatment with either superovulation and intracervical insemination or intrauterine insemination alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-183
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume340
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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