Efficacy of orally administered immune serum globulin against type III group B streptococcal colonization and systemic disease in an infant rat model

Kwang Sik Kim, Karen Dunn, Scott A. McGeary, E. Richard Stiehm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We established an experimental animal model of the gastrointestinal colonization and systemic disease following oral challengeof type III group B streptococcal strain in 3-day-old newborn rats. Two type III group B streptococcal strains isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of septic newborn infants produced colonization in 57-87% of the challenged animals and 13-31% of these colonized animals developed systemic disease. Using this new animal model, we evaluated the effect of orally administered human immune serum globulin on the colonization and systemic disease. This antiserum contained 21 μg/ml of type III group B streptococcal antibody of human IgG class. Animals fed with immune serum globulin developed significantly lower rates of colonization and systemic disease than those of control (albumin or saline) (23 versus 71%, p<0.001 for colonization;7 versus 31%, p0.1).These findings suggest that orally administered immune serum globulin is beneficial in the prevention of colonization and systemic disease in this rat model and that this protective effect of oral immune serum globulin occurs primarily at the mucosal level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1329-1331
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Research
Volume18
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Serum Globulins
Immunoglobulins
Immune Sera
Animal Models
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Albumins
Immunoglobulin G
Newborn Infant
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Efficacy of orally administered immune serum globulin against type III group B streptococcal colonization and systemic disease in an infant rat model. / Kim, Kwang Sik; Dunn, Karen; McGeary, Scott A.; Stiehm, E. Richard.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 18, No. 12, 1984, p. 1329-1331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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