Efficacy and safety of liraglutide, a once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of sub-population data from seven phase III trials

M. E. Shomali, D. D. Ørsted, A. J. Cannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Analyses were performed on patient-level data from individuals self-defined as African-American or non-African-American in seven phase III studies. Endpoints included change in HbA1c level, fasting plasma glucose level and body weight from baseline, proportion of patients reaching HbA1c target [< 53 mmol/mol (< 7.0%)], and incidence of hypoglycaemia and nausea. Analyses used data obtained after 26 weeks. Within-population comparisons of liraglutide were performed vs placebo for African-American and non-African-American patient groups. In addition, between-population comparisons with non-African-American patients were performed for each treatment. Results: In African-American patients (n = 225), HbA1c was significantly reduced at 26 weeks with liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg (−11 and −14 mmol/mol, respectively compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). There were also significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (−2.4 and −3.1 mmol/l, respectively, compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). Statistically significant reductions in body weight were observed with 1.8 mg liraglutide (−2.1 kg compared with placebo; P = 0.0056), but not with 1.2 mg liraglutide (−0.26 kg; P = 0.7307). The P value for interaction between treatment and race was significant for body weight (P = 0.0355). The incidence of non-severe hypoglycaemia with liraglutide was low (11–15% of patients), and < 25% of patients receiving liraglutide experienced nausea. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that liraglutide is well tolerated and efficacious for treatment of Type 2 diabetes in African-American patients, with an efficacy that was shown not to differ from that observed in non-African-American patients over 26 weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-203
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Meta-Analysis
Safety
Population
Placebos
Body Weight
Hypoglycemia
Nausea
Fasting
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor
Liraglutide
Glucose
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{677082f7b4254e08834387194206dc0a,
title = "Efficacy and safety of liraglutide, a once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of sub-population data from seven phase III trials",
abstract = "Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Analyses were performed on patient-level data from individuals self-defined as African-American or non-African-American in seven phase III studies. Endpoints included change in HbA1c level, fasting plasma glucose level and body weight from baseline, proportion of patients reaching HbA1c target [< 53 mmol/mol (< 7.0{\%})], and incidence of hypoglycaemia and nausea. Analyses used data obtained after 26 weeks. Within-population comparisons of liraglutide were performed vs placebo for African-American and non-African-American patient groups. In addition, between-population comparisons with non-African-American patients were performed for each treatment. Results: In African-American patients (n = 225), HbA1c was significantly reduced at 26 weeks with liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg (−11 and −14 mmol/mol, respectively compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). There were also significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (−2.4 and −3.1 mmol/l, respectively, compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). Statistically significant reductions in body weight were observed with 1.8 mg liraglutide (−2.1 kg compared with placebo; P = 0.0056), but not with 1.2 mg liraglutide (−0.26 kg; P = 0.7307). The P value for interaction between treatment and race was significant for body weight (P = 0.0355). The incidence of non-severe hypoglycaemia with liraglutide was low (11–15{\%} of patients), and < 25{\%} of patients receiving liraglutide experienced nausea. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that liraglutide is well tolerated and efficacious for treatment of Type 2 diabetes in African-American patients, with an efficacy that was shown not to differ from that observed in non-African-American patients over 26 weeks.",
author = "Shomali, {M. E.} and {\O}rsted, {D. D.} and Cannon, {A. J.}",
year = "2017",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficacy and safety of liraglutide, a once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes

T2 - a meta-analysis of sub-population data from seven phase III trials

AU - Shomali, M. E.

AU - Ørsted, D. D.

AU - Cannon, A. J.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Analyses were performed on patient-level data from individuals self-defined as African-American or non-African-American in seven phase III studies. Endpoints included change in HbA1c level, fasting plasma glucose level and body weight from baseline, proportion of patients reaching HbA1c target [< 53 mmol/mol (< 7.0%)], and incidence of hypoglycaemia and nausea. Analyses used data obtained after 26 weeks. Within-population comparisons of liraglutide were performed vs placebo for African-American and non-African-American patient groups. In addition, between-population comparisons with non-African-American patients were performed for each treatment. Results: In African-American patients (n = 225), HbA1c was significantly reduced at 26 weeks with liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg (−11 and −14 mmol/mol, respectively compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). There were also significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (−2.4 and −3.1 mmol/l, respectively, compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). Statistically significant reductions in body weight were observed with 1.8 mg liraglutide (−2.1 kg compared with placebo; P = 0.0056), but not with 1.2 mg liraglutide (−0.26 kg; P = 0.7307). The P value for interaction between treatment and race was significant for body weight (P = 0.0355). The incidence of non-severe hypoglycaemia with liraglutide was low (11–15% of patients), and < 25% of patients receiving liraglutide experienced nausea. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that liraglutide is well tolerated and efficacious for treatment of Type 2 diabetes in African-American patients, with an efficacy that was shown not to differ from that observed in non-African-American patients over 26 weeks.

AB - Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide in African-American people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Analyses were performed on patient-level data from individuals self-defined as African-American or non-African-American in seven phase III studies. Endpoints included change in HbA1c level, fasting plasma glucose level and body weight from baseline, proportion of patients reaching HbA1c target [< 53 mmol/mol (< 7.0%)], and incidence of hypoglycaemia and nausea. Analyses used data obtained after 26 weeks. Within-population comparisons of liraglutide were performed vs placebo for African-American and non-African-American patient groups. In addition, between-population comparisons with non-African-American patients were performed for each treatment. Results: In African-American patients (n = 225), HbA1c was significantly reduced at 26 weeks with liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg (−11 and −14 mmol/mol, respectively compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). There were also significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (−2.4 and −3.1 mmol/l, respectively, compared with placebo; P < 0.0001). Statistically significant reductions in body weight were observed with 1.8 mg liraglutide (−2.1 kg compared with placebo; P = 0.0056), but not with 1.2 mg liraglutide (−0.26 kg; P = 0.7307). The P value for interaction between treatment and race was significant for body weight (P = 0.0355). The incidence of non-severe hypoglycaemia with liraglutide was low (11–15% of patients), and < 25% of patients receiving liraglutide experienced nausea. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that liraglutide is well tolerated and efficacious for treatment of Type 2 diabetes in African-American patients, with an efficacy that was shown not to differ from that observed in non-African-American patients over 26 weeks.

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