Effects on blood pressure of reduced dietary sodium and the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (dash) diet

Frank M. Sacks, Laura P. Svetkey, William M. Vollmer, Lawrence Appel, George A. Bray, David Harsha, Eva Obarzanek, Paul R. Conlin, Edgar R Miller, Denise G. Simons-Morton, Njeri Karanja, Pao Hwa Lin, Mikel Aickin, Marlene M. Most-Windhauser, Thomas J. Moore, Michael A. Proschan, Jeffrey A. Cutler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The effect of dietary composition on blood pressure is a subject of public health importance. We studied the effect of different levels of dietary sodium, in conjunction with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which is rich in vegetables, fruits, and low-fat dairy products, in persons with and in those without hypertension. Methods: A total of 412 participants were randomly assigned to eat either a control diet typical of intake in the United States or the DASH diet. Within the assigned diet, participants ate foods with high, intermediate, and low levels of sodium for 30 consecutive days each, in random order. Results: Reducing the sodium intake from the high to the intermediate level reduced the systolic blood pressure by 2.1 mm Hg (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-10
Number of pages8
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume344
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2001

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Dietary Sodium
Diet
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Sodium
Dairy Products
Vegetables
Fruit
Public Health
Fats
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Effects on blood pressure of reduced dietary sodium and the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (dash) diet. / Sacks, Frank M.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Vollmer, William M.; Appel, Lawrence; Bray, George A.; Harsha, David; Obarzanek, Eva; Conlin, Paul R.; Miller, Edgar R; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Karanja, Njeri; Lin, Pao Hwa; Aickin, Mikel; Most-Windhauser, Marlene M.; Moore, Thomas J.; Proschan, Michael A.; Cutler, Jeffrey A.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 344, No. 1, 04.01.2001, p. 3-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sacks, FM, Svetkey, LP, Vollmer, WM, Appel, L, Bray, GA, Harsha, D, Obarzanek, E, Conlin, PR, Miller, ER, Simons-Morton, DG, Karanja, N, Lin, PH, Aickin, M, Most-Windhauser, MM, Moore, TJ, Proschan, MA & Cutler, JA 2001, 'Effects on blood pressure of reduced dietary sodium and the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (dash) diet', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 344, no. 1, pp. 3-10. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM200101043440101
Sacks, Frank M. ; Svetkey, Laura P. ; Vollmer, William M. ; Appel, Lawrence ; Bray, George A. ; Harsha, David ; Obarzanek, Eva ; Conlin, Paul R. ; Miller, Edgar R ; Simons-Morton, Denise G. ; Karanja, Njeri ; Lin, Pao Hwa ; Aickin, Mikel ; Most-Windhauser, Marlene M. ; Moore, Thomas J. ; Proschan, Michael A. ; Cutler, Jeffrey A. / Effects on blood pressure of reduced dietary sodium and the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (dash) diet. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 344, No. 1. pp. 3-10.
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AU - Vollmer, William M.

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AU - Bray, George A.

AU - Harsha, David

AU - Obarzanek, Eva

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AU - Miller, Edgar R

AU - Simons-Morton, Denise G.

AU - Karanja, Njeri

AU - Lin, Pao Hwa

AU - Aickin, Mikel

AU - Most-Windhauser, Marlene M.

AU - Moore, Thomas J.

AU - Proschan, Michael A.

AU - Cutler, Jeffrey A.

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