Effects of therapist gender and type of attention on assessment and treatment of attention-maintained destructive behavior

Linda A. Leblanc, Louis P Hagopian, Jean M. Marhefka, Arthur E. Wilke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adult attention frequently serves as a maintaining variable for problem behavior (Iwata et al., 1994). In addition, different aspects of attention such as the content of a statement or the person delivering the attention may moderate the rate of problem behavior and potentially affect treatment outcome (Fisher, Ninness, Piazza, & Owen-DeSchryver, 1996). In the current study, we examined the effects of two variables hypothesized to affect the rate of attention-maintained aggression in an adolescent female with profound mental retardation: gender of therapist and type of attention (physical versus verbal). The initial study examined the results of functional analyses conducted with therapists of different genders. An analysis was then conducted to determine the main and interaction effects of therapist gender and type of attention on the effectiveness of noncontingent reinforcement. The results indicate that each variable affected the rate of problem behavior (i.e., main effects) and that the two variables combined to produce an even greater effect (i.e., interaction effect) for males than for females. Next, we examined the impact of therapist gender on the effectiveness of an alternative intervention (functional communication training with extinction). The results support the initial hypotheses that therapist gender impacted both assessment and intervention results for this adolescent female.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-57
Number of pages19
JournalBehavioral Interventions
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Therapeutics
Physical Therapists
Aggression
Intellectual Disability
Communication
Problem Behavior
Behavior Problems
Interaction
Psychological Extinction
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Piazza
Communication Training
Person
Functional Communication
Reinforcement
Physical
Extinction
Treatment Outcome
Mental Retardation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

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Effects of therapist gender and type of attention on assessment and treatment of attention-maintained destructive behavior. / Leblanc, Linda A.; Hagopian, Louis P; Marhefka, Jean M.; Wilke, Arthur E.

In: Behavioral Interventions, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2001, p. 39-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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