Effects of the dopaminergenic agent and NMDA receptor antagonist amantadine on cognitive function, cerebral glucose metabolism and D2 receptor availability in chronic traumatic brain injury: A study using positron emission tomography (PET)

Marilyn F. Kraus, G. S. Smith, M. Butters, A. J. Donnell, E. Dixon, C. Yilong, D. Marion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Primary objective: This study was performed to assess effects of amantadine (AMH), a dopaminergic agent and NMDA antagonist, on chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). The primary hypotheses were that amantadine treatment would result in executive function improvement and increased activity in pre-frontal cortex. Research design: An open-label design was used. Methods: Twenty-two subjects underwent neuropsychological testing pre- and post-12 week treatment. Six subjects also underwent PET scanning. Intervention: Amantadine 400 mg was administered per day. Results: Significant improvements on tests of executive function were observed with treatment. Analysis of PET data demonstrated a significant increase in left pre-frontal cortex glucose metabolism. There was a significant positive correlation between executive domain scores and left pre-frontal glucose metabolism. Conclusions: This is the first known study to assess amantadine in chronic TBI using PET and the data are consistent with the hypotheses. The conduction of further studies is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-479
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Injury
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amantadine
  • Dopamine
  • Executive function
  • Frontal lobes
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of the dopaminergenic agent and NMDA receptor antagonist amantadine on cognitive function, cerebral glucose metabolism and D2 receptor availability in chronic traumatic brain injury: A study using positron emission tomography (PET)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this