Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro

D. Goosey, J. S. Zigler, I. B C Matheson, J. N. Kinoshita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have recently demonstrated that singlet oxygen-mediated photooxidation can cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in bovine lens crystallins in vitro. Because these changes closely parallel modifications known to occur in human crystallins during aging and cataractogenesis, it was suggested that singlet oxygen may play an important role in these processes in vivo. To confirm these results, obtained with photosensitizers free in solution, we now report results from experiments with a polymer-bound photosensitizer and with photophysically generated singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen photodynamically generated by polymerimmobilized rose bengal produced the following modifications to human lens crystallins in vitro: covalent cross-linking, increased blue fluorescence, yellow pigmentation, and formation of heavy-molecular-weight aggregates. Singlet oxygen generated photophysically was shown to cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in human crystallins. These findings substantiate the hypothesis that singlet oxygen may play an important role in the changes seen in human lens proteins during aging and cataractogenesis

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-683
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume20
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Singlet Oxygen
Crystallins
Lenses
Photosensitizing Agents
Fluorescence
Rose Bengal
Pigmentation
In Vitro Techniques
Polymers
Molecular Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Goosey, D., Zigler, J. S., Matheson, I. B. C., & Kinoshita, J. N. (1981). Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 20(5), 679-683.

Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro. / Goosey, D.; Zigler, J. S.; Matheson, I. B C; Kinoshita, J. N.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 20, No. 5, 1981, p. 679-683.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goosey, D, Zigler, JS, Matheson, IBC & Kinoshita, JN 1981, 'Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 679-683.
Goosey D, Zigler JS, Matheson IBC, Kinoshita JN. Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 1981;20(5):679-683.
Goosey, D. ; Zigler, J. S. ; Matheson, I. B C ; Kinoshita, J. N. / Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 1981 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 679-683.
@article{29c6974fd1704ab79130a083948d0b76,
title = "Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro",
abstract = "We have recently demonstrated that singlet oxygen-mediated photooxidation can cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in bovine lens crystallins in vitro. Because these changes closely parallel modifications known to occur in human crystallins during aging and cataractogenesis, it was suggested that singlet oxygen may play an important role in these processes in vivo. To confirm these results, obtained with photosensitizers free in solution, we now report results from experiments with a polymer-bound photosensitizer and with photophysically generated singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen photodynamically generated by polymerimmobilized rose bengal produced the following modifications to human lens crystallins in vitro: covalent cross-linking, increased blue fluorescence, yellow pigmentation, and formation of heavy-molecular-weight aggregates. Singlet oxygen generated photophysically was shown to cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in human crystallins. These findings substantiate the hypothesis that singlet oxygen may play an important role in the changes seen in human lens proteins during aging and cataractogenesis",
author = "D. Goosey and Zigler, {J. S.} and Matheson, {I. B C} and Kinoshita, {J. N.}",
year = "1981",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "679--683",
journal = "Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science",
issn = "0146-0404",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of singlet oxygen on human lens crystallins in vitro

AU - Goosey, D.

AU - Zigler, J. S.

AU - Matheson, I. B C

AU - Kinoshita, J. N.

PY - 1981

Y1 - 1981

N2 - We have recently demonstrated that singlet oxygen-mediated photooxidation can cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in bovine lens crystallins in vitro. Because these changes closely parallel modifications known to occur in human crystallins during aging and cataractogenesis, it was suggested that singlet oxygen may play an important role in these processes in vivo. To confirm these results, obtained with photosensitizers free in solution, we now report results from experiments with a polymer-bound photosensitizer and with photophysically generated singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen photodynamically generated by polymerimmobilized rose bengal produced the following modifications to human lens crystallins in vitro: covalent cross-linking, increased blue fluorescence, yellow pigmentation, and formation of heavy-molecular-weight aggregates. Singlet oxygen generated photophysically was shown to cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in human crystallins. These findings substantiate the hypothesis that singlet oxygen may play an important role in the changes seen in human lens proteins during aging and cataractogenesis

AB - We have recently demonstrated that singlet oxygen-mediated photooxidation can cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in bovine lens crystallins in vitro. Because these changes closely parallel modifications known to occur in human crystallins during aging and cataractogenesis, it was suggested that singlet oxygen may play an important role in these processes in vivo. To confirm these results, obtained with photosensitizers free in solution, we now report results from experiments with a polymer-bound photosensitizer and with photophysically generated singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen photodynamically generated by polymerimmobilized rose bengal produced the following modifications to human lens crystallins in vitro: covalent cross-linking, increased blue fluorescence, yellow pigmentation, and formation of heavy-molecular-weight aggregates. Singlet oxygen generated photophysically was shown to cause an increase in blue fluorescence and covalent cross-linking in human crystallins. These findings substantiate the hypothesis that singlet oxygen may play an important role in the changes seen in human lens proteins during aging and cataractogenesis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019404484&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019404484&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7216682

AN - SCOPUS:0019404484

VL - 20

SP - 679

EP - 683

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 0146-0404

IS - 5

ER -