Effects of selection in a prospective study of forced expiratory volume in Vermont granite workers

E. A. Eisen, D. H. Wegman, Thomas Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Granite workers lost to follow-up during a 5-yr study of pulmonary function were examined. We found that in workers who had left the industry for other employment, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) values declined at a faster rate than in those who remained employed or retired during the study period. We investigated the application of a currently recommended repeatability criterion for pulmonary function tests by looking at different patterns of failing to satisfy the criterion (PFT-failure) over multiple testing sessions. Workers with persistent PFT-failure were found to have faster rates of FEV1 decline than did subjects with none or only intermittent failures. In a regression analysis, job termination was found to be more strongly associated with a steep FEV1 slope when it had been preceded by a pattern of persistent PFT-failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-591
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume128
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Lost to Follow-Up
Respiratory Function Tests
Forced Expiratory Volume
Industry
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Lung
granite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Effects of selection in a prospective study of forced expiratory volume in Vermont granite workers. / Eisen, E. A.; Wegman, D. H.; Louis, Thomas.

In: American Review of Respiratory Disease, Vol. 128, No. 4, 1983, p. 587-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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