Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on cytokines in peripheral blood for healthy participants: A prospective, single-blinded Study

Alexander D. Truong, Michelle E. Kho, Roy G Brower, Dorianne R Feldman, Elizabeth Ann Colantuoni, Dale Needham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The effect of exercise on cytokines may improve muscle strength. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a muscle-preserving therapy that benefits patients unable to participate in active exercise. How NMES alters cytokines is unclear. The aim of this study was to study the effects of 1 NMES session on cytokines associated with protein metabolism during exercise. Methods: We evaluated the effects of NMES on IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels in peripheral blood. Participants received NMES to bilateral lower extremity muscles (quadriceps, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius) for 30 min. Blood samples immediately pre- and post-NMES were drawn at 15-min intervals to 2-h follow-up, and the mean values of pre-NMES levels were compared to peak and trough post-NMES levels. For cytokines with significant changes, we conducted a repeated-measures linear regression analysis. We also measured post-NMES lactate and creatine kinase levels. Results: We enrolled nine eligible participants. There was a significant increase in peak IL-6 from the mean pre-NMES value [0·65 (0·89) to 1·04 (0·89) pg ml-1, P = 0·001] and a significant decrease in trough IL-1 [0·08 (0·07) to 0·02 (0·02) pg ml-1, P = 0·041] and TNF-α [2·42 (0·54) to 2·16 (0·59) pg ml-1, P = 0·021]. In repeated-measures regression analysis, we identified significantly higher mean IL-6 values throughout the full 120 min post-NMES period, and a significantly higher mean IL-1 value at 30 min post-NMES. There were no significant differences in peak IL-10, trough IL-6, lactate, or creatine kinase values. Conclusions: In nine healthy humans, 30 min of NMES was temporally associated with changes in cytokines similar to the effects of active exercise and may mediate NMES' observed effects on reducing muscle weakness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Electric Stimulation
Healthy Volunteers
Cytokines
Interleukin-6
Interleukin-1
Exercise
Creatine Kinase
Interleukin-10
Lactic Acid
Regression Analysis
Muscle Weakness
Quadriceps Muscle
Muscle Strength
Lower Extremity
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Healthy adults
  • Neuromuscular electrical stimulation
  • Neuromuscular electrostimulation
  • Weakness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{2b98f54b984e4a20a2c742a4e8d5fa20,
title = "Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on cytokines in peripheral blood for healthy participants: A prospective, single-blinded Study",
abstract = "Introduction: The effect of exercise on cytokines may improve muscle strength. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a muscle-preserving therapy that benefits patients unable to participate in active exercise. How NMES alters cytokines is unclear. The aim of this study was to study the effects of 1 NMES session on cytokines associated with protein metabolism during exercise. Methods: We evaluated the effects of NMES on IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels in peripheral blood. Participants received NMES to bilateral lower extremity muscles (quadriceps, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius) for 30 min. Blood samples immediately pre- and post-NMES were drawn at 15-min intervals to 2-h follow-up, and the mean values of pre-NMES levels were compared to peak and trough post-NMES levels. For cytokines with significant changes, we conducted a repeated-measures linear regression analysis. We also measured post-NMES lactate and creatine kinase levels. Results: We enrolled nine eligible participants. There was a significant increase in peak IL-6 from the mean pre-NMES value [0·65 (0·89) to 1·04 (0·89) pg ml-1, P = 0·001] and a significant decrease in trough IL-1 [0·08 (0·07) to 0·02 (0·02) pg ml-1, P = 0·041] and TNF-α [2·42 (0·54) to 2·16 (0·59) pg ml-1, P = 0·021]. In repeated-measures regression analysis, we identified significantly higher mean IL-6 values throughout the full 120 min post-NMES period, and a significantly higher mean IL-1 value at 30 min post-NMES. There were no significant differences in peak IL-10, trough IL-6, lactate, or creatine kinase values. Conclusions: In nine healthy humans, 30 min of NMES was temporally associated with changes in cytokines similar to the effects of active exercise and may mediate NMES' observed effects on reducing muscle weakness.",
keywords = "Cytokines, Healthy adults, Neuromuscular electrical stimulation, Neuromuscular electrostimulation, Weakness",
author = "Truong, {Alexander D.} and Kho, {Michelle E.} and Brower, {Roy G} and Feldman, {Dorianne R} and Colantuoni, {Elizabeth Ann} and Dale Needham",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/cpf.12290",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging",
issn = "1475-0961",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on cytokines in peripheral blood for healthy participants

T2 - A prospective, single-blinded Study

AU - Truong, Alexander D.

AU - Kho, Michelle E.

AU - Brower, Roy G

AU - Feldman, Dorianne R

AU - Colantuoni, Elizabeth Ann

AU - Needham, Dale

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Introduction: The effect of exercise on cytokines may improve muscle strength. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a muscle-preserving therapy that benefits patients unable to participate in active exercise. How NMES alters cytokines is unclear. The aim of this study was to study the effects of 1 NMES session on cytokines associated with protein metabolism during exercise. Methods: We evaluated the effects of NMES on IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels in peripheral blood. Participants received NMES to bilateral lower extremity muscles (quadriceps, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius) for 30 min. Blood samples immediately pre- and post-NMES were drawn at 15-min intervals to 2-h follow-up, and the mean values of pre-NMES levels were compared to peak and trough post-NMES levels. For cytokines with significant changes, we conducted a repeated-measures linear regression analysis. We also measured post-NMES lactate and creatine kinase levels. Results: We enrolled nine eligible participants. There was a significant increase in peak IL-6 from the mean pre-NMES value [0·65 (0·89) to 1·04 (0·89) pg ml-1, P = 0·001] and a significant decrease in trough IL-1 [0·08 (0·07) to 0·02 (0·02) pg ml-1, P = 0·041] and TNF-α [2·42 (0·54) to 2·16 (0·59) pg ml-1, P = 0·021]. In repeated-measures regression analysis, we identified significantly higher mean IL-6 values throughout the full 120 min post-NMES period, and a significantly higher mean IL-1 value at 30 min post-NMES. There were no significant differences in peak IL-10, trough IL-6, lactate, or creatine kinase values. Conclusions: In nine healthy humans, 30 min of NMES was temporally associated with changes in cytokines similar to the effects of active exercise and may mediate NMES' observed effects on reducing muscle weakness.

AB - Introduction: The effect of exercise on cytokines may improve muscle strength. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a muscle-preserving therapy that benefits patients unable to participate in active exercise. How NMES alters cytokines is unclear. The aim of this study was to study the effects of 1 NMES session on cytokines associated with protein metabolism during exercise. Methods: We evaluated the effects of NMES on IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels in peripheral blood. Participants received NMES to bilateral lower extremity muscles (quadriceps, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius) for 30 min. Blood samples immediately pre- and post-NMES were drawn at 15-min intervals to 2-h follow-up, and the mean values of pre-NMES levels were compared to peak and trough post-NMES levels. For cytokines with significant changes, we conducted a repeated-measures linear regression analysis. We also measured post-NMES lactate and creatine kinase levels. Results: We enrolled nine eligible participants. There was a significant increase in peak IL-6 from the mean pre-NMES value [0·65 (0·89) to 1·04 (0·89) pg ml-1, P = 0·001] and a significant decrease in trough IL-1 [0·08 (0·07) to 0·02 (0·02) pg ml-1, P = 0·041] and TNF-α [2·42 (0·54) to 2·16 (0·59) pg ml-1, P = 0·021]. In repeated-measures regression analysis, we identified significantly higher mean IL-6 values throughout the full 120 min post-NMES period, and a significantly higher mean IL-1 value at 30 min post-NMES. There were no significant differences in peak IL-10, trough IL-6, lactate, or creatine kinase values. Conclusions: In nine healthy humans, 30 min of NMES was temporally associated with changes in cytokines similar to the effects of active exercise and may mediate NMES' observed effects on reducing muscle weakness.

KW - Cytokines

KW - Healthy adults

KW - Neuromuscular electrical stimulation

KW - Neuromuscular electrostimulation

KW - Weakness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84983156611&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84983156611&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/cpf.12290

DO - 10.1111/cpf.12290

M3 - Article

C2 - 26475418

AN - SCOPUS:84983156611

JO - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

JF - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

SN - 1475-0961

ER -