Effects of medicated diet to eradicate Helicobacter spp. on growth, pathology, and infection status in Rag1-/- and nude mice

Caroline M. Garrett, Dillon Muth, Julie Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The use of a commercial 4-drug diet has been shown to eradicate Helicobacter spp. from immunocompetent mice and those with innate immunodeficiencies. However the efficacy of this diet has not been confirmed in mice with altered adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that an 8-wk treatment with medicated diet would eradicate H. hepaticus and H. typhlonius from young naturally infected nude and Rag1 mice lacking functional T cells (Foxn1 nu) or T and B cells (B6.129S7-Rag1tm1Mom/J), respectively. We evaluated helicobacter status, body weight, and gross and histologic changes between medicated and control diet in groups of infected and uninfected mice throughout treatment and at 8 wk after treatment completion. Initial infection status was confirmed by fecal PCR at weaning and 3 wk later, with study initiation in 7-wk-old mice. PCR testing demonstrated that independent of strain and sex, all treated mice tested negative for Helicobacter spp. after 4 wk of treatment and remained negative for the duration of the study. Irrespective of infection status, nude and Rag1 mice fed 8 wk of medicated diet gained less weight than did their untreated controls. Both strains normalized body weight while on control diet for the 8 wk after treatment. Mice fed medicated diet developed severe gastroesophageal hyperkeratosis, suggestive of reduced feed consumption, and enlarged ceca. These conditions improved or resolved after the return to control diet. This report is the first to demonstrate the efficacy and physical effects of providing medicated diet for the eradication of Helicobacter spp. from mice with adaptive immune deficiencies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-245
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Volume53
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2014

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Helicobacter
mice
diet
infection
immunosuppression
T-lymphocytes
hyperkeratosis
medicated feeds
body weight
cecum
B-lymphocytes
weaning
feed intake
drugs
duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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abstract = "The use of a commercial 4-drug diet has been shown to eradicate Helicobacter spp. from immunocompetent mice and those with innate immunodeficiencies. However the efficacy of this diet has not been confirmed in mice with altered adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that an 8-wk treatment with medicated diet would eradicate H. hepaticus and H. typhlonius from young naturally infected nude and Rag1 mice lacking functional T cells (Foxn1 nu) or T and B cells (B6.129S7-Rag1tm1Mom/J), respectively. We evaluated helicobacter status, body weight, and gross and histologic changes between medicated and control diet in groups of infected and uninfected mice throughout treatment and at 8 wk after treatment completion. Initial infection status was confirmed by fecal PCR at weaning and 3 wk later, with study initiation in 7-wk-old mice. PCR testing demonstrated that independent of strain and sex, all treated mice tested negative for Helicobacter spp. after 4 wk of treatment and remained negative for the duration of the study. Irrespective of infection status, nude and Rag1 mice fed 8 wk of medicated diet gained less weight than did their untreated controls. Both strains normalized body weight while on control diet for the 8 wk after treatment. Mice fed medicated diet developed severe gastroesophageal hyperkeratosis, suggestive of reduced feed consumption, and enlarged ceca. These conditions improved or resolved after the return to control diet. This report is the first to demonstrate the efficacy and physical effects of providing medicated diet for the eradication of Helicobacter spp. from mice with adaptive immune deficiencies.",
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