Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms: A meta-analysis

Amy B. Stapleton, Jeffrey Lating, Matthew Kirkhart, George Everly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A meta-analysis of 11 studies (N=2124) investigating the impact of individual crisis intervention with medical patients yielded a significant, overall moderate effect size, d=0.44. The strongest effect of individual crisis intervention was on posttraumatic stress symptoms (d=0.57) and anxiety symptoms (d=0.52). Specific moderating factors, such as single versus multiple sessions, single versus multiple components of intervention, and level of interventionists' training, were also analyzed. In sum, the results support highly trained interventionists continuing to provide multi-session interventions in order to mitigate posttraumatic symptomatology following traumatic events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-238
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume77
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

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Crisis Intervention
Meta-Analysis
Anxiety
Depression

Keywords

  • Crisis intervention
  • Medical patients
  • PTSD
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms : A meta-analysis. / Stapleton, Amy B.; Lating, Jeffrey; Kirkhart, Matthew; Everly, George.

In: Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 231-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stapleton, Amy B. ; Lating, Jeffrey ; Kirkhart, Matthew ; Everly, George. / Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms : A meta-analysis. In: Psychiatric Quarterly. 2006 ; Vol. 77, No. 3. pp. 231-238.
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