Effects of maximal exercise and venous occlusion on fibrinolytic activity in physically active and inactive men

L. M. Szymanski, R. R. Pate, J. L. Durstine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to 1) characterize changes in fibrinolytic activity in response to maximal exercise and 5-min venous occlusion and 2) compare responses in men of various habitual physical activity levels. Tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) activity were measured in 15 inactive, 15 regularly active, and 15 highly active men. Data were analyzed using a three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures. Pretest TPA activity was similar among groups. TPA activity increased postexercise with higher values seen in the active groups (P <0.001). The highly active group also significantly increased TPA activity postvenous occlusion (P <0.01). Pretest PAI-1 activity was different among groups, with the inactive group showing the highest activity and the highly active group the lowest (P <0.05). PAI-1 activity decreased with exercise (P <0.01) but did not change with venous occlusion. In conclusion, active men exhibited greater changes in fibrinolytic activity with maximal exercise and venous occlusion than inactive men. This enhanced fibrinolytic activity may be an important mechanism mediating the cardio- protective effect provided by regular physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2305-2310
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume77
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Tissue Plasminogen Activator
Exercise
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • exertion
  • fibrinolysis
  • physical fitness
  • plasminogen activator inhibitor
  • tissue plasminogen activator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of maximal exercise and venous occlusion on fibrinolytic activity in physically active and inactive men. / Szymanski, L. M.; Pate, R. R.; Durstine, J. L.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 77, No. 5, 1994, p. 2305-2310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szymanski, L. M. ; Pate, R. R. ; Durstine, J. L. / Effects of maximal exercise and venous occlusion on fibrinolytic activity in physically active and inactive men. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1994 ; Vol. 77, No. 5. pp. 2305-2310.
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