EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON T‐CELLS IN HIV‐INFECTED SUBJECTS ARE NOT DEPENDENT ON HISTORY OF SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER

Norman E. Rosenthal, Charlotte Brown, Dan A. Oren, Giorgio Galetto, Paul J. Schwartz, James D. Malley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In order to evaluate the effect of light on helper‐ and suppressor‐T‐cell counts in HIV‐infected individuals, with and without a history of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), we treated 35 subjects with 45 min of light therapy in the morning, in a crossover design involving two 2 week treatment conditions: visible white light (half‐peak band width, 530‐620 nm; 10 000 lux) and visible red light (half‐peak band width, 615‐685 nm; 175 lux). We found small but significant differences between the two treatment conditions, with higher CD4 and CD8 levels during the white, as compared with the red, condition. There were no differences between baseline and treatment conditions. Both light treatment conditions were associated with significant mood improvements in the SAD, but not the non‐SAD, subjects. There was no evidence that the higher cell counts seen under the bright light conditions were mediated by the effects of light on mood or on plasma Cortisol levels. While the size of the light effect on T‐cells renders questionable the potential therapeutic value of this treatment modality for HIV, the finding is of theoretical interest and is reassuring for those HIV‐infected individuals who require light treatment for other reasons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-319
Number of pages6
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1994
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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