Effects of graded hypotension on cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time in dogs

M. Ferrari, D. A. Wilson, D. F. Hanley, R. J. Traystman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that cerebral blood flow (CBF) is maintained by vasodilation, which manifests itself as a progressive increase in mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) when cerebral perfusion pressure is reduced. Cerebral perfusion pressure was decreased in 10 pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs by controlled hemorrhage. Microsphere- determined CBF was autoregulated in all tested cerebral regions over the 40- to 130-mmHg cerebral perfusion pressure range but decreased by 50% at ~30 mmHg. MTT and CBV progressively and proportionately increased in the right parietal cerebral cortex over the 40- to 130-mmHg cerebral perfusion pressure range. Total hemoglobin content (Hb(t)), measured in the same area by an optical method, increased in parallel with the increases in CBV computed as the (CBF · MTT) product. At 30 mmHg cerebral perfusion pressure, CBV and Hb were still increased and MTT was disproportionately lengthened (690% of control). We conclude that within the autoregulatory range, CBF constancy is maintained by both increased CBV and MTT. Outside the autoregulatory range, substantial prolongation of the MTT occurs. When CBV is maximal, further reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure produce disproportionate increases in MTT that signal the loss of cerebral vascular dilatory hemodynamic reserve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H1908-H1914
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume262
Issue number6 31-6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Keywords

  • brain monitoring
  • cerebral circulation
  • cerebral hemoglobin content
  • hemodynamic reserve
  • near- infrared spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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