Effects of genetic background on neonatal Borna disease virus infection-induced neurodevelopmental damage: I. Brain pathology and behavioral deficits

Mikhail Pletnikov, Steven A. Rubin, Michael W. Vogel, Timothy H Moran, Kathryn M. Carbone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The pathogenic mechanisms of gene-environment interactions determining variability of human neurodevelopmental disorders remain unclear. In the two consecutive papers, we used the neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection rat model of neurodevelopmental damage to evaluate brain pathology, monoamine alterations, behavioral deficits, and responses to pharmacological treatments in two inbred rat strains, Lewis and Fisher344. The first paper reports that despite comparable virus replication and distribution in the brain of both rat strains, neonatal BDV infection produced significantly greater thinning of the neocortex in BDV-infected Fisher344 rats compared to BDV-infected Lewis rats, while no strain-related differences were found in BDV-induced granule cell loss in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and cerebellar hypoplasia. Unlike BDV-infected Lewis rats, more severe BDV-induced brain pathology in Fisher344 rats was associated with (1) greater locomotor activity to novelty and (2) impairment of habituation and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response. The present data demonstrate that the same environmental insult can produce differential neuroanatomical and behavioral abnormalities in genetically different inbred rat strains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-107
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume944
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 19 2002

Fingerprint

Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Borna disease virus
Virus Diseases
Pathology
Brain
Inbred Strains Rats
Startle Reflex
Gene-Environment Interaction
Parahippocampal Gyrus
Neocortex
Dentate Gyrus
Locomotion
Virus Replication
Genetic Background
Acoustics
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Borna
  • Cerebellum
  • Hippocampus
  • Hyperactivity
  • Startle
  • Stereotypy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Effects of genetic background on neonatal Borna disease virus infection-induced neurodevelopmental damage : I. Brain pathology and behavioral deficits. / Pletnikov, Mikhail; Rubin, Steven A.; Vogel, Michael W.; Moran, Timothy H; Carbone, Kathryn M.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 944, No. 1-2, 19.07.2002, p. 97-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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