Effects of electrical stimulation on isolated rodent gastric smooth muscle cells evaluated via a joint computational simulation and experimental approach

P. Du, S. Li, G. O'Grady, L. K. Cheng, A. J. Pullan, J. D.Z. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gastric electrical stimulation (GES) involves the delivery of electrical impulses to the stomach for therapeutic purposes. New GES protocols are needed that are optimized for improved motility outcomes and energy efficiency. In this study, a biophysically based smooth muscle cell (SMC) model was modified on the basis of experimental data and employed in conjunction with experimental studies to define the effects of a large range of GES protocols on individual SMCs. For the validation studies, rat gastric SMCs were isolated and subjected to patch-clamp analysis during stimulation. Experimental results were in satisfactory agreement with simulation results. The results define the effects of a wide range of GES parameters (pulse width, amplitude, and pulse-train frequency) on isolated SMCs. The minimum pulse width required to invoke a supramechanical threshold response from SMCs (defined at -30 mV) was 65 ms (at 250-pA amplitude). The minimum amplitude required to invoke this threshold was 75 pA (at 1,000-ms pulse width). The amplitude of the invoked response beyond this threshold was proportional to the stimulation amplitude. A highfrequency train of stimuli (40 Hz; 10 ms, 150 pA) could invoke and maintain the SMC plateau phase while requiring 60% less power and accruing ∼30% less intracellular Ca2+ concentration during the plateau phase than a comparable single-pulse protocol could in a demonstrated example. Validated computational simulations are an effective strategy for efficiently identifying effective minimum-energy GES protocols, and pulse-train protocols may also help to reduce the power consumption of future GES devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)G672-G680
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume297
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Cell model
  • Electrical therapy
  • Gastric electrical stimulation
  • Slow wave
  • Stimulation protocol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

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