Effects of early and late-onset treatment with carvedilol in an experimental model of aortic regurgitation

Kristian Eskesen, Niels Thue Olsen, Veronica L. Dimaano, Thomas Fritz-Hansen, Peter Sogaard, Theodore P. Abraham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Beta-blockade is contraindicated in severe aortic regurgitation (AR) due to the fear of prolonging diastole and thus aggravate regurgitation. However, this has never been scientifically proven and positive effects of targeting the sympathetic system in AR has been demonstrated in several studies. Method: Thirty-nine Sprague–Dawley rats with AR were randomized to ten weeks of medical treatment with carvedilol or no treatment. Treatment was initiated either early or late after AR induction. The effect of carvedilol was assessed by serial echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic measurements. Results: AR resulted in eccentric hypertrophy and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. LV remodeling and function as measured by echocardiography was unaffected by treatment. LV dimensions were similar between treated and untreated groups and measures of LV performance (including strain and strain rate) were also unaltered. This result was confirmed by invasive measurements showing maximal and minimal pressure–time development, LV volumes, and LV pressures, to be unaltered by treatment. On the contrary, despite relative bradycardia carvedilol did not reflect any negative impact on the heart. Conclusion: Carvedilol did not improve left ventricular remodeling or function in rats with surgically induced AR. Despite relative bradycardia, we did not find carvedilol to negatively impact the heart, either when treatment was initiated early or late in the course of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number52
JournalSpringerPlus
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 30 2015

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Aortic Valve Insufficiency
Theoretical Models
Ventricular Remodeling
Bradycardia
Left Ventricular Function
Echocardiography
Diastole
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Ventricular Pressure
Hypertrophy
Fear
carvedilol
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Aortic regurgitation
  • Echocardiography
  • Experimental animal studies
  • Heart valvular disease
  • Invasive hemodynamic measurements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Eskesen, K., Olsen, N. T., Dimaano, V. L., Fritz-Hansen, T., Sogaard, P., & Abraham, T. P. (2015). Effects of early and late-onset treatment with carvedilol in an experimental model of aortic regurgitation. SpringerPlus, 4(1), [52]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-015-0829-6

Effects of early and late-onset treatment with carvedilol in an experimental model of aortic regurgitation. / Eskesen, Kristian; Olsen, Niels Thue; Dimaano, Veronica L.; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Sogaard, Peter; Abraham, Theodore P.

In: SpringerPlus, Vol. 4, No. 1, 52, 30.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eskesen, K, Olsen, NT, Dimaano, VL, Fritz-Hansen, T, Sogaard, P & Abraham, TP 2015, 'Effects of early and late-onset treatment with carvedilol in an experimental model of aortic regurgitation', SpringerPlus, vol. 4, no. 1, 52. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-015-0829-6
Eskesen, Kristian ; Olsen, Niels Thue ; Dimaano, Veronica L. ; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas ; Sogaard, Peter ; Abraham, Theodore P. / Effects of early and late-onset treatment with carvedilol in an experimental model of aortic regurgitation. In: SpringerPlus. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 1.
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