Effects of cytokines and heat shock on defensin levels of cultured keratinocytes

Roger J. Bick, Brian J. Poindexter, Satyanarayan Bhat, Salil Gulati, Maximilian Buja, Stephen M. Milner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Burns have been associated with high levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines which promote systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), immunosuppression and sepsis for which no effective treatment is currently available. Defensins, a family of cationic naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, are considered important components of the innate immune system and enhance adaptive immunity. This study examines the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), gamma-interferon (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) on human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) levels in cultured keratinocytes. We also examined the effects of heat shock at 42°C. The results demonstrate that only TNFα shows significant induction of HBD-2 but this induction was not sustained in the long-term. In addition, endogenous levels of defensin were significantly reduced by exposure to heat shock. The keratinocytes also responded to IL-1β by becoming hypertrophic. These results indicate that stress-related, pro-inflammatory cytokines can induce keratinocytes to synthesize HBD-2, while heat shock appears to reduce its production. These experiments give us further insight into the role of natural antimicrobial peptides under conditions of stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-333
Number of pages5
JournalBurns
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Defensins
Keratinocytes
Shock
Hot Temperature
Cytokines
Interleukin-1
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
Peptides
Adaptive Immunity
Burns
Immunosuppression
Interferon-gamma
Immune System
Sepsis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Defensin
  • Fluorescent imaging
  • Heat shock
  • Keratinocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Bick, R. J., Poindexter, B. J., Bhat, S., Gulati, S., Buja, M., & Milner, S. M. (2004). Effects of cytokines and heat shock on defensin levels of cultured keratinocytes. Burns, 30(4), 329-333. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2003.12.009

Effects of cytokines and heat shock on defensin levels of cultured keratinocytes. / Bick, Roger J.; Poindexter, Brian J.; Bhat, Satyanarayan; Gulati, Salil; Buja, Maximilian; Milner, Stephen M.

In: Burns, Vol. 30, No. 4, 06.2004, p. 329-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bick, RJ, Poindexter, BJ, Bhat, S, Gulati, S, Buja, M & Milner, SM 2004, 'Effects of cytokines and heat shock on defensin levels of cultured keratinocytes', Burns, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 329-333. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2003.12.009
Bick RJ, Poindexter BJ, Bhat S, Gulati S, Buja M, Milner SM. Effects of cytokines and heat shock on defensin levels of cultured keratinocytes. Burns. 2004 Jun;30(4):329-333. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2003.12.009
Bick, Roger J. ; Poindexter, Brian J. ; Bhat, Satyanarayan ; Gulati, Salil ; Buja, Maximilian ; Milner, Stephen M. / Effects of cytokines and heat shock on defensin levels of cultured keratinocytes. In: Burns. 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 329-333.
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