Effects of conflict-of-interest policies in psychiatry residency on antidepressant prescribing.

Andrew J. Epstein, David A. Asch, Colleen L Barry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Concerns about the pharmaceutical industry's influence in academic medical centers and on medical education have led many medical schools and teaching hospitals to adopt conflict-of-interest (COI) policies. Although the restrictiveness of these policies differs, the goal is the same: to shield physicians-in-training from the persuasive aspects of pharmaceutical promotion. But do these policies work? This Issue Brief examines how COI policies affect the prescribing patterns of antidepressants, one of the most heavily promoted drug classes in the past decade. As such, it provides the first empirical evidence of the effects of COI policies in residency on the subsequent prescribing patterns of practicing physicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalLDI issue brief
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Conflict of Interest
Internship and Residency
Antidepressive Agents
Psychiatry
Physicians' Practice Patterns
Drug Industry
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Teaching Hospitals
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of conflict-of-interest policies in psychiatry residency on antidepressant prescribing. / Epstein, Andrew J.; Asch, David A.; Barry, Colleen L.

In: LDI issue brief, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.2013, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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