Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: A randomized controlled trial

Karlene Ball, Daniel B. Berch, Karin F. Helmers, Jared B. Jobe, Mary D. Leveck, Michael Marsiske, John N. Morris, George Rebok, David M. Smith, Sharon L. Tennstedt, Frederick W. Unverzagt, Sherry L. Willis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Cognitive function in older adults is related to independent living and need for care. However, few studies have addressed whether improving cognitive functions might have short- or long-term effects on activities related to living independently. Objective: To evaluate whether 3 cognitive training interventions improve mental abilities and daily functioning in older, independent-living adults. Design: Randomized, controlled, single-blind trial with recruitment conducted from March 1998 to October 1999 and 2-year follow-up through December 2001. Setting and Participants: Volunteer sample of 2832 persons aged 65 to 94 years recruited from senior housing, community centers, and hospital/clinics in 6 metropolitan areas in the United States. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: 10-session group training for memory (verbal episodic memory; n=711), or reasoning (ability to solve problems that follow a serial pattern; n=705), or speed of processing (visual search and identification; n=712); or a no-contact control group (n=704). For the 3 treatment groups, 4-session booster training was offered to a 60% random sample 11 months later. Main Outcome Measures: Cognitive function and cognitively demanding everyday functioning. Results: Thirty participants were incorrectly randomized and were excluded from the analysis. Each intervention improved the targeted cognitive ability compared with baseline, durable to 2 years (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2271-2281
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume288
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 13 2002

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Aptitude
Cognition
Independent Living
Randomized Controlled Trials
Episodic Memory
Community Hospital
Volunteers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Learning
Control Groups
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ball, K., Berch, D. B., Helmers, K. F., Jobe, J. B., Leveck, M. D., Marsiske, M., ... Willis, S. L. (2002). Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association, 288(18), 2271-2281. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.288.18.2271

Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults : A randomized controlled trial. / Ball, Karlene; Berch, Daniel B.; Helmers, Karin F.; Jobe, Jared B.; Leveck, Mary D.; Marsiske, Michael; Morris, John N.; Rebok, George; Smith, David M.; Tennstedt, Sharon L.; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Willis, Sherry L.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 288, No. 18, 13.11.2002, p. 2271-2281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ball, K, Berch, DB, Helmers, KF, Jobe, JB, Leveck, MD, Marsiske, M, Morris, JN, Rebok, G, Smith, DM, Tennstedt, SL, Unverzagt, FW & Willis, SL 2002, 'Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: A randomized controlled trial', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 288, no. 18, pp. 2271-2281. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.288.18.2271
Ball, Karlene ; Berch, Daniel B. ; Helmers, Karin F. ; Jobe, Jared B. ; Leveck, Mary D. ; Marsiske, Michael ; Morris, John N. ; Rebok, George ; Smith, David M. ; Tennstedt, Sharon L. ; Unverzagt, Frederick W. ; Willis, Sherry L. / Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults : A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 2002 ; Vol. 288, No. 18. pp. 2271-2281.
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