Effects of age upon interhemispheric EEG coherence in normal adults

Frank H. Duffy, Gloria B. Mcanulty, Marilyn Albert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Age related differences in quantified electrophysiological measures of interhemispheric EEG coherence were studied in 371 subjects (171 males and 200 females), ages 20-80, all of whom were judged to be optimally healthy. Principal components analysis (PCA) was performed on interhemispheric coherence of Laplacian referenced data from eight homologous left-right electrode pairs, from 0.5 to 32 Hz. Regression procedures, using signals from artifact monitoring channels, were used to minimize effects of eye movement and muscle artifact. Forty-six factors described 80% of the total variance, with electrode location the primary source of communality in factor formation. Within 350 right-handed subjects, results indicated a broad trend for decreased interhemispheric coherence with advancing age. Using canonical correlation, the coherence-based factors also successfully predicted spectral variables, previously found to maximally illsutrate age- related EEG desynchronization. We speculate that age-related reduction of interhemispheric coherence may in part explain age-related EEG desynchrony and stems from age-related reduction of cortical connectivity. Gender differences in interhemispheric coherence were also evident. Females demonstrated higher interhemispheric coherence than males. Within a smaller subpopulation of 63 subjects (21 left and 42 right handed), there was a gender-by-handedness interaction, with higher interhemispheric coherence in right-handed females than right-handed males and the reverse in left-handed male and female subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-599
Number of pages13
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Artifacts
Electrodes
Functional Laterality
Eye Movements
Principal Component Analysis
Muscles

Keywords

  • Age
  • Analysis of variance
  • Canonical correlation
  • Corpus callosum
  • Gender
  • Handedness
  • Healthy adults
  • Interhemispheric coherence
  • Principal components analysis
  • Quantitative EEG

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Effects of age upon interhemispheric EEG coherence in normal adults. / Duffy, Frank H.; Mcanulty, Gloria B.; Albert, Marilyn.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 17, No. 4, 1996, p. 587-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duffy, Frank H. ; Mcanulty, Gloria B. ; Albert, Marilyn. / Effects of age upon interhemispheric EEG coherence in normal adults. In: Neurobiology of Aging. 1996 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 587-599.
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