Effectiveness of omega-3 polysaturated fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation for treating hypertriglyceridemia in children and adolescents

Nita Chahal, Cedric Manlhiot, Helen Wong, Brian W. McCrindle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Limited pharmacological options are available for management pediatric hypertriglyceridemia. We examined the effectiveness of dietary fish oil supplementation as a means to reduce triglyceride levels in pediatric patients. We reviewed 111 children aged 8 to 18 years with hypertriglyceridemia (1.5 mmol/L) undergoing treatment in a specialized dyslipidemia clinic. At the treating cardiologist's discretion, 60 subjects received nonprescription fish oil supplementation (500-1000 mg/d), while the remaining patients did not. Initially there were no baseline differences between groups, including the use of concomitant lipid-lowering medication. Treatment with fish oil was associated with a potential clinically relevant but non-statistically significant decrease in triglycerides and triglyceride-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio. Fish oil had no effect on HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol, or total cholesterol. All associations remained unchanged when adjusted for body mass index z score, nutrition, physical activity, and screen time. Fish oil supplementation was not significantly effective in treating hypertriglyceridemia in pediatric patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-651
Number of pages7
JournalClinical pediatrics
Volume53
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • dyslipidemia
  • fish oil
  • pediatrics
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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