Effectiveness of methods used to teach breast self-examination

S. E. Bennett, Robert S Lawrence, D. F. Angiolillo, S. D. Bennett, S. Budman, G. M. Schneider, A. R. Assaf, M. Feldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The efficacy of breast self-examination (BSE) is limited by the extent to which women can be taught to perform a frequent and proficient examination. We randomized 783 women from a health maintenance organization into group instruction, individual instruction, individual instruction with a reminder system, or minimal intervention designed to simulate an office encounter where BSE was encouraged but not taught. The percentage of lumps 1 cm and smaller detected in silicone breast models, the number of false-positive detections, the search technique, and the self-reported BSE frequency were measured before and four months after intervention. Multiple tests for comparisons of interventions showed that the interventions containing BSE instruction were comparable in increasing true- and false-positive detection of lumps and in improving search technique, but the minimal intervention resulted in lower scores for all three outcomes (P <.0001). Women in all four intervention groups increased their BSE frequency over the four-month follow-up period, but the greatest improvement in frequency was reported among women receiving reminders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-217
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume6
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Breast Self-Examination
Reminder Systems
Health Maintenance Organizations
Women's Health
Silicones
Breast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bennett, S. E., Lawrence, R. S., Angiolillo, D. F., Bennett, S. D., Budman, S., Schneider, G. M., ... Feldstein, M. (1990). Effectiveness of methods used to teach breast self-examination. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 6(4), 208-217.

Effectiveness of methods used to teach breast self-examination. / Bennett, S. E.; Lawrence, Robert S; Angiolillo, D. F.; Bennett, S. D.; Budman, S.; Schneider, G. M.; Assaf, A. R.; Feldstein, M.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1990, p. 208-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bennett, SE, Lawrence, RS, Angiolillo, DF, Bennett, SD, Budman, S, Schneider, GM, Assaf, AR & Feldstein, M 1990, 'Effectiveness of methods used to teach breast self-examination', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 208-217.
Bennett SE, Lawrence RS, Angiolillo DF, Bennett SD, Budman S, Schneider GM et al. Effectiveness of methods used to teach breast self-examination. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 1990;6(4):208-217.
Bennett, S. E. ; Lawrence, Robert S ; Angiolillo, D. F. ; Bennett, S. D. ; Budman, S. ; Schneider, G. M. ; Assaf, A. R. ; Feldstein, M. / Effectiveness of methods used to teach breast self-examination. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 208-217.
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