Effect of trabeculae and papillary muscles on the hemodynamics of the left ventricle

Vijay Vedula, Jung Hee Seo, Albert C. Lardo, Rajat Mittal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The impact of surface trabeculae and papillary muscles on the hemodynamics of the left ventricle (LV) is investigated using numerical simulations. Simulations of ventricular flow are conducted for two different models of the LV derived from high-resolution cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans using an immersed boundary method-based flow solver. One model comprises a trabeculated left ventricle (TLV) that includes both trabeculae and papillary muscles, while the second model has a smooth left ventricle that is devoid of any of these surface features. Results indicate that the trabeculae and papillary muscles significantly disrupt the vortices that develop during early filling in the TLV model. Large recirculation zones are found to form in the wake of the papillary muscles; these zones enhance the blockage provided by the papillary muscles and create a path for the mitral jet to penetrate deeper into the ventricular apex during diastole. During systole, the trabeculae enhance the apical washout by ‘squeezing’ the flow from the apical region. Finally, the trabeculae enhance viscous dissipation rate of the ventricular flow, but this effect is not significant in the overall power budget.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-21
Number of pages19
JournalTheoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics
Volume30
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Keywords

  • Hemodynamics
  • Immersed boundary method
  • Left ventricle
  • Papillary muscles
  • Trabeculae
  • Ventriculography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Engineering(all)
  • Computational Mechanics

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