Effect of PEEP and jugular venous compression on canine cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in the head elevated position

T. J.K. Toung, M. Miyabe, A. J. McShane, M. C. Rogers, R. J. Traystman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cerebral blood flow (CBF) (radiolabelled microspheres) and oxygen consumption (CMRO2) were studied in nine dogs during 30 min of either neck vein compression or application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) ventilation. With the animal in the prone position, elevation of the head from horizontal to 30 cm above the heart markedly decreased cisterna magna (P(CSF)) and dorsal sagittal sinus pressure (P(CV)). With the head elevated, compression of neck veins using neck tourniquet (pressure 40 mmHg) increased P(CSF) and P(CV) from 3.6 ± 2.2 to 6.8 ± 4.8 and -2.5 ± 2.7 to 2.3 ± 2.3 mmHg (mean ± SE, P < 0.05), respectively, while total or regional CBF and CMRO2 remained unchanged. Application of PEEP (15 cm H2O) increased right atrial pressure (-4.7 ± 1.7 to -0.1 ± 3.4 mmHg, P < 0.05), but did not affect P(CSF) or P(CV) (3.4 ± 3.3 to 3.3 ± 3.7 and -3.5 ± 2.6 to -4.1 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05). Total or regional CBF and CMRO2 were also unaffected. These data demonstrate that, although neither maneuver affects CBF or CMRO2 neck vein compression elevates P(CV) above atmospheric pressure, but PEEP does not. In patients at risk for cerebral venous embolism, intermittent neck vein compression should be used as a prophylactic measure to prevent air embolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesiology
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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