Effect of patient's life expectancy on the cost-effectiveness of treatment for ocular hypertension

Steven M. Kymes, Michael R. Plotzke, Michael A. Kass, Michael Boland, Mae O. Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To assess the influence of expected life span on the cost-effectiveness of treating ocular hypertension to prevent primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods: We used a Markov simulation model to estimate the cost and benefit of ocular hypertension treatment over a person's remaining life. We examined the influence of age on the cost-effectiveness decision in 2 ways: (1) by evaluating specific age cohorts to assess the influence of age at the initiation of treatment; and (2) by evaluating the influence of a specific life span. Results: At a willingness to pay $50 000/quality-adjusted life year to $100 000/quality-adjusted life year, treatment of people with a 2% or greater annual risk of developing glaucoma was cost-effective for people aged 45 years with a life expectancy of at least 18 remaining years. However, to be cost-effective, a person aged 55 years must have a life expectancy of 21 remaining years and someone aged 65 years must have a life expectancy of 23 remaining years. Conclusions: A person with ocular hypertension must have a life expectancy of at least 18 remaining years to justify treatment at a threshold of a 2% or greater annual risk of developing glaucoma. Persons at higher levels of risk require a life expectancy of 7 to 10 additional years to justify treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-618
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume128
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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Ocular Hypertension
Life Expectancy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Glaucoma
Therapeutics
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Effect of patient's life expectancy on the cost-effectiveness of treatment for ocular hypertension. / Kymes, Steven M.; Plotzke, Michael R.; Kass, Michael A.; Boland, Michael; Gordon, Mae O.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 128, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 613-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kymes, Steven M. ; Plotzke, Michael R. ; Kass, Michael A. ; Boland, Michael ; Gordon, Mae O. / Effect of patient's life expectancy on the cost-effectiveness of treatment for ocular hypertension. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 2010 ; Vol. 128, No. 5. pp. 613-618.
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