Effect of oral sensorimotor treatment on measures of growth, eating efficiency and aspiration in the dysphagic child with cerebral palsy

E. G. Gisel, T. Applegate-Ferrante, J. E. Benson, J. F. Bosma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Twenty-seven children (mean age 5.1 years) with cerebral palsy and moderate eating impairment were studied to determine frequency of aspiration and the effect of 10 and 20 weeks of oral sensorimotor therapy on eating efficiency and measures of growth (weight, skinfold thickness). The eating efficiency of the children did not change markedly in response to oral sensorimotor therapy. Children maintained their centile rank in weight-for-age and skinfold-for-age measurements. However, there was no catch-up growth. The findings suggest that eating efficiency is not a good estimator of treatment outcome, but rather a diagnostic indicator of the severity of eating impairment. Monitoring of these children's growth is essential in order to provide nutritional rehabilitation as soon as their eating skills can no longer keep up with growth demands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)528-543
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume37
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuroscience(all)

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